Application Security

How Threats Increase in Internet Time

Cybercrime incidents and costs increase with each passing minute on the Internet.

A famous song from the musical Rent pointed out that there are 525,600 minutes in a year. A new report looks at just how much Internet evil can fit into each minute of the year, and it's definitely not all about love.

It's about the numbers inside the $1,138,888 dollars of cybercrime cost each minute that add up to $600 billion in damage each year, according to a February, 2018 McAfee report on the impact of cybercrime. And the details of those numbers tell a story of growing risk due to a growing computer footprint, detailed in The Evil Internet Minute, a new infographic generated by researchers at RiskIQ.

"Some of it [the data] is based on reports from companies like McAfee and Gartner, but the research comes from our own systems," says Yonathan Klijnsma, threat researcher at RiskIQ. He explains that RiskIQ builds large databases from information found in global data crawling and used portions of that data to draw conclusions on individuals threats and trends.

Those conclusions involve numbers that become almost mesmerizing as the time scales and dollar amounts change: For example, RiskIQ reports that four potential vulnerable Web components are discovered each minute. That works out to more than two million such discoveries every year.

Klijnsma worries more, however, about active criminal activities like the .07 incidents of Magecart (36,792 per year) that RiskIQ found. "People thought the Ticketmaster breach was a one-off based on Magecart, but it's a credit-card skimming group," Klijnsma says, referring to the June incident. Instead, he says, the group has taken the "classic" credit card skimmer attack and moved it from the gas pump and ATM to e-commerce sites.

The lesson for organizations from reports such as this? "You want it to be more expensive for the bad guys," he says. "You need to keep your stuff updated. People tend to install things and forget about them," Klijnsma says.

"Whatever's online immediately starts to go out of date. If you leave it on the Internet, it will be out of date in a few months," he says. 

Beyond up-to-date software, he says, "One golden rule is limiting exposure. Nothing goes accessible online until it really has to."

Related Content:

Learn from the industry's most knowledgeable CISOs and IT security experts in a setting that is conducive to interaction and conversation. Early bird rate ends August 31. Click for more info

Curtis Franklin Jr. is Senior Editor at Dark Reading. In this role he focuses on product and technology coverage for the publication. In addition he works on audio and video programming for Dark Reading and contributes to activities at Interop ITX, Black Hat, INsecurity, and ... View Full Bio

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
How the US Chooses Which Zero-Day Vulnerabilities to Stockpile
Ricardo Arroyo, Senior Technical Product Manager, Watchguard Technologies,  1/16/2019
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Current Issue
The Year in Security 2018
This Dark Reading Tech Digest explores the biggest news stories of 2018 that shaped the cybersecurity landscape.
Flash Poll
How Enterprises Are Attacking the Cybersecurity Problem
How Enterprises Are Attacking the Cybersecurity Problem
Data breach fears and the need to comply with regulations such as GDPR are two major drivers increased spending on security products and technologies. But other factors are contributing to the trend as well. Find out more about how enterprises are attacking the cybersecurity problem by reading our report today.
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2019-3906
PUBLISHED: 2019-01-18
Premisys Identicard version 3.1.190 contains hardcoded credentials in the WCF service on port 9003. An authenticated remote attacker can use these credentials to access the badge system database and modify its contents.
CVE-2019-3907
PUBLISHED: 2019-01-18
Premisys Identicard version 3.1.190 stores user credentials and other sensitive information with a known weak encryption method (MD5 hash of a salt and password).
CVE-2019-3908
PUBLISHED: 2019-01-18
Premisys Identicard version 3.1.190 stores backup files as encrypted zip files. The password to the zip is hard-coded and unchangeable. An attacker with access to these backups can decrypt them and obtain sensitive data.
CVE-2019-3909
PUBLISHED: 2019-01-18
Premisys Identicard version 3.1.190 database uses default credentials. Users are unable to change the credentials without vendor intervention.
CVE-2019-3910
PUBLISHED: 2019-01-18
Crestron AM-100 before firmware version 1.6.0.2 contains an authentication bypass in the web interface's return.cgi script. Unauthenticated remote users can use the bypass to access some administrator functionality such as configuring update sources and rebooting the device.