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Attacks/Breaches

1/25/2016
10:30 AM
Marilyn Cohodas
Marilyn Cohodas
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How (And Why) Hackers Target Your Business

Don't miss this inside look by a trio of experts from industry and law enforcement during Dark Reading's virtual event, Cybersecurity: The Business View. Now available On-Demand.

Why do cyber attackers target business? For the same reason robbers rob banks: because that’s where the money is, at least according to a widely credited quote from the infamous 1950s bank robber Willie Sutton.

Today, stealing digital currency – everything from personal identifiable information like social security numbers and birth dates to actually pilfering hard cash from banks via spearphising attacks – is big business in its own right. It’s also a topic Dark Reading will be exploring in depth, Tuesday, Jan. 26, during our upcoming virtual event Cybersecurity: The Business View, (now available on demand) from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Eastern Standard Time. 

The panel on cybercrime will begin at 3:45 pm EST with a trio of experts drawing from industry and law enforcement: David West, assistant section chief, FBI Cyber Division; John Terrill, founder & CEO, Drawbridge Networks; and Adam Meyer, chief security strategist, SurfWatch Labs. We’ll be taking a deep dive into how attackers get access to high value data, who the principal adversaries are, and offering an inside look at what the FBI and other law enforcement agencies are doing to make cyber threats a major priority in their operations.

I hope you’ll join me as I moderate the 45-minute session, which will also include an opportunity for you to ask direct questions to our panel through online chat in a virtual networking lounge – all from the convenience of your desk at home, work or any other comfortable location. You’ll learn:

  • Where the major risks are, how much they’ve grown, who are the players and how they operate;
  • What businesses should be doing that they’re not doing now (besides spending money on technology and staff)  to become less vulnerable;
  • About security strategies – technological and operational -- that work (and don’t work).
  • Which insiders pose the greatest threats – and how to raise the bar in mitigating threats from within; 
  • Why it take so long to discover a breach – and what you can do to  shorten that time period;
  • How to work with law enforcement.

I look forward to “seeing” you in the virtual auditorium tomorrow at 11:00 a.m. EST, when Verizon RISK Team managing director Bryan Sartin kicks off the event with his keynote, providing an executive-level view on the impact of data breaches, the costs and benefits of investing in IT security technology and skills, and a real-world perspective on how cybersecurity fits into the business equation.

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Marilyn has been covering technology for business, government, and consumer audiences for over 20 years. Prior to joining UBM, Marilyn worked for nine years as editorial director at TechTarget Inc., where she launched six Websites for IT managers and administrators supporting ... View Full Bio
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Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
1/28/2016 | 12:34:41 PM
Re: More that the Dollar Bill
I think that was also a Fairly Oddparents episode.  ;)
RetiredUser
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RetiredUser,
User Rank: Ninja
1/28/2016 | 11:45:54 AM
Re: More that the Dollar Bill
Joe, I think the orphan scenario presents challenges, but doesn't require tools other than what is out there already.  While a person won't be at the other end of the orphan's data stream to receive/utilize stolen info, or to update instructions/features, there is risk that a potential step-parent could stumble upon them and take over their use.  If dormant, all you can do is use existing tools to comb through systems and look for known signatures in activity and code profiles.  If active and trying to reach out to its absent parent or systems long down where data would have been sent, all the same network and data analysis tools would be used to detect aberrant activity.  

Of course, if this were Ghost in the Shell, things would be a whole lot more interesting and there's be AI-driven bots out there hunting down these orphans and shredding them into digital oblivion... sorry, got carried away there :-)
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
1/27/2016 | 3:36:35 PM
Re: More that the Dollar Bill
@Christian: I'm curious to what extent "good-guy" AI tools could be used to help defeat the "self-aware" bots and tools out there that you mention.
RetiredUser
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RetiredUser,
User Rank: Ninja
1/25/2016 | 10:45:40 PM
Re: More that the Dollar Bill
And we haven't even mentioned autonomous RATs, bots and spiders!  There's nothing more exciting (or tragic) than trying to anticipate through the chaos of "self-sufficient" and "self-aware" hacking tools when they will next strike.  How many of these things are out there, now orphans, their creators long gone, still infecting and attacking systems...
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
1/25/2016 | 7:01:08 PM
Re: More that the Dollar Bill
It's also important to consider the potential links between ability of hackers to do damage and the kind of damage they are looking to do.  The quality of attacks you'll face from Russian cybergangs looking to make some fast bucks will be very different from the quality of attacks you'll face from Chinese nation-state hackers, which in turn are very different from the quality of attacks you'll face from independent hacktivists.  Additionally, different things are at stake in all three examples.
RetiredUser
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RetiredUser,
User Rank: Ninja
1/25/2016 | 6:42:56 PM
More that the Dollar Bill
I look forward to the panel.  I think it is also important to remind companies that hackers are not always in their business for the money.  This is an important distinction because tactics change between those seeking profit and those seeking information, or to do harm.  Especially with mega corporations who may have leadership who are clueless as to why someone would have a grudge against their company, making the assumption that cyber attackers are only there for the money could cost dearly.  Also, how one responds to a cyber-attack might depend upon whether they are just thieves, or on a mission driven by a cause.  It's definitely a new era and "hackers" are far more than the band of thieves many imagine they are.
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