Attacks/Breaches

10/29/2018
05:00 PM
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New Report: IoT Now Top Internet Attack Target

IoT devices are the top targets of cyberattacks -- most of which originate on IoT devices, new report finds.

A new threat analysis report shows that IoT devices are now the primary target of criminals working on the Internet. And those criminals are learning and adapting their tactics to meet the improved defenses being put into place.

The report, The Hunt for IoT, is the fifth volume of the IoT threat report from F5 Labs. Among their findings are that the classic Port 23 attack using telnet has declined as organizations shut down that service, and targeted probes now have been replaced by an increase in hits on every IoT-related port.

According to F5 Labs, the vast majority (84%) of attack source traffic is coming from telecom companies, indicating that existing botnets are busy trying to recruit new devices into their nets.

For more, read here.

 

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