Attacks/Breaches

6/27/2018
06:47 AM
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Today! 'Why Cybercriminals Attack,' A Dark Reading Virtual Event

Wednesday, June 27, this all-day event starting at 11 a.m. ET, will help you decide who and what you really need to defend against, and how to do it more effectively.

You cannot defend against everything. Business demands and resource constraints force you to focus your security efforts on the threat actors most likely to target you, the assets they're most likely to attack, and the exploits they're most likely to use. Don't know what those are? Then join us Wednesday, June 27, for "Why Cybercriminals Attack," a Dark Reading Virtual Event, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Eastern Time.

We start with a discussion of attacker motivations: who are the adversaries, who do they want to hurt, and why. Then we dig into their methods: How do the attacks vary from threat actor to threat actor.  

We'll proceed to discussions about how to know when you're under cyberattack. Experts will discuss the most effective and innovative tools and techniques for detecting exploits; even those that use sophisticated obfuscation techniques. They'll also discuss how best to collect and analyze threat intelligence feeds, so that you have the insight you need when you need it most,  instead of too many feeds, and too little time. 

Finally, we'll close with a discussion of what to do when your best efforts to prevent or detect have failed, and it's time to simply contain the impact of a compromise. You'll hear about the most essential elements of incident response including how to tell the extent of a compromise, how to determine whether your systems are still vulnerable, and when to contact law enforcement.

It all starts at 11 a.m. E.T. Wednesday, June 27. Register now.

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RyanSepe
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RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
6/29/2018 | 2:49:40 PM
Archive
Was the virtual event archived somewhere? If so, someone point me in the right direction please. 
BrianN060
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BrianN060,
User Rank: Ninja
6/29/2018 | 2:07:33 PM
Should have asked at event
The keynote presentation walked through various types of cyber attackers.  Regarding "nation state warriors" (the well-funded and  disciplined  state-sponsored organizations), I wish I had asked if there were any data or personal observations concerning these teams and their leveraging the information, best practices and recommendations provided by events such as this?  The obvious assumption is that they (the nation-state teams), view what these experts' advise, as valuable intelligence on their "enemy's" position, doctrine, effectiveness and initiatives.

As there's no way to keep those eyes and ears from all such resources, I wonder if there's a general philosophy guiding our advisor's guidance?  Some advice is advisable, even when you know the black hats are paying as much or more attention than John Q. Public (promoting better passwords, no more helps cyber criminals than telling people not to leave their keys on the hood of their car is a boon to car thieves). 

I do wonder if anyone has looked at the issue of categorizing types of cyber security data and recommendations, based on assessments as to who benefits more from disclosure: the black hats or the ones we want to protect?
BrianN060
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BrianN060,
User Rank: Ninja
6/27/2018 | 10:12:14 PM
Content rich, with high quality presentations
Though I couldn't devote the day to attending this event; what I did catch was impressive.  As the content and resources will be available on-demand, I'll review the parts I was able to see, and check out the parts I missed.  I often get more out of the replay, than real-time.  As it should be, with what is intended to be, and is, thought provoking.  

Playing catch-up means missing out on active participation; but still a valuable resource.  The presenters DR lines up are exceptional.  Their knowledge, experience and presentation skills are first rate. 

Highly recommended.
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