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5/21/2018
12:00 PM
Kelly Sheridan
Kelly Sheridan
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Google to Delete 'Secure' Label from HTTPS Sites

Google acknowledges HTTPS as the Internet standard with plans to remove 'secure' from all HTTPS sites.

Google plans to remove the "secure" label from HTTPS websites starting in September 2018, a move intended to acknowledge HTTPS as the standard for browser security. Users should expect all the sites they visit to be secured with HTTPS, the company reported last week.

Earlier this year, Google announced plans to mark all HTTP sites as "not secure" and alert users when they visit unencrypted pages. Previously, HTTP usage was too high to brand all unsecured pages with a warning. Now HTTPS is more common so Google is making it the standard by flagging unencrypted websites and removing secure indicators from encrypted ones.

"I like the idea of assuming a 'secure' setting by default and training users to accept a secure, default setting," says Dr. Engin Kirda, co-founder and Chief Architect at Lastline. "I expect users will be more likely to take 'not secure' warnings more seriously rather than actively check that a website is secure, as in the past."

The change will come into effect in Chrome 69. Read more details here.

Kelly Sheridan is the Staff Editor at Dark Reading, where she focuses on cybersecurity news and analysis. She is a business technology journalist who previously reported for InformationWeek, where she covered Microsoft, and Insurance & Technology, where she covered financial ... View Full Bio

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RyanSepe
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RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
5/21/2018 | 3:41:40 PM
Not Secure
I have not visited an external HTTP site for quite some time. I am all for this change. It looks to normalize HTTPS as the standard (which it most definitely is) and shame HTTP as an insecure mode of transit. 
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