Endpoint //

Privacy

5/25/2018
12:25 PM
50%
50%

Privacy Survey Says: Americans Don't Want to Sell Their Data

A new survey shows the extent to which Americans are reluctant to sell their personal information for any price.

A new study says that many of the assumptions corporations have been making about consumers and their privacy are seriously flawed. And in the new dawn of GDPR, those bad assumptions could have serious consequences.

The study, conducted by digital communications firm Syzygy, surveyed 3,000 adults in the US, UK, and Germany. Asked whether they would sell their private data to a company — even a favored brand — 55% of Americans say that they would not, no matter the price offered.

One of the major surprises in the data came from the question of whether consumers would trade private information for a smoother or more personal online experience. While it is an article of faith for many online companies and services that consumers are happy to make this trade, only 21% of  Americans are willing to do so.

For those who are willing to sell their data to companies, $150 is the median price they would accept. And when it comes to ongoing monitoring of online activity, 33% say they would be willing to let Google watch them Web-surf — in exchange for $25 a month.

For more, read here.

Dark Reading's Quick Hits delivers a brief synopsis and summary of the significance of breaking news events. For more information from the original source of the news item, please follow the link provided in this article. View Full Bio

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Dr.T
50%
50%
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
5/30/2018 | 6:02:52 PM
$25 by Google
This would not happen in my view, they may not be making that much money per personal record.
Dr.T
50%
50%
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
5/30/2018 | 6:01:17 PM
Re: Surprised?
t paralyzes individuals into never wanting to provide personal data. That is true in my view too. Accessive data collaction is scary.
Dr.T
50%
50%
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
5/30/2018 | 5:59:21 PM
Re: Surprised?
Unfortunately, this has been escalated to the point where too much data is acquired needlessly. I agree with this. For facebook more data is better, so result is not that great for the memebers.
Dr.T
50%
50%
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
5/30/2018 | 5:57:54 PM
Re: Surprised?
How is this surprising in any way? It is for me partially. We tend to not care about privacy that much if we get something out of it.
Dr.T
50%
50%
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
5/30/2018 | 5:56:30 PM
Personal data
It depends what we mean by personl data. If first name, last name and email I think i would sell it with quite low price, knowing that it is out there already.
RyanSepe
50%
50%
RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
5/24/2018 | 1:16:43 PM
Surprised?
How is this surprising in any way? There are only certain functions that require the use of personal information. Unfortunately, this has been escalated to the point where too much data is acquired needlessly. It paralyzes individuals into never wanting to provide personal data.
Why CISOs Need a Security Reality Check
Joel Fulton, Chief Information Security Officer for Splunk,  6/13/2018
Cisco Talos Summit: Network Defenders Not Serious Enough About Attacks
Curtis Franklin Jr., Senior Editor at Dark Reading,  6/13/2018
Four Faces of Fraud: Identity, 'Fake' Identity, Ransomware & Digital
David Shefter, Chief Technology Officer at Ziften Technologies,  6/14/2018
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon
Current Issue
Flash Poll
New Best Practices for Secure App Development
New Best Practices for Secure App Development
The transition from DevOps to SecDevOps is combining with the move toward cloud computing to create new challenges - and new opportunities - for the information security team. Download this report, to learn about the new best practices for secure application development.
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2018-8030
PUBLISHED: 2018-06-20
A Denial of Service vulnerability was found in Apache Qpid Broker-J versions 7.0.0-7.0.4 when AMQP protocols 0-8, 0-9 or 0-91 are used to publish messages with size greater than allowed maximum message size limit (100MB by default). The broker crashes due to the defect. AMQP protocols 0-10 and 1.0 a...
CVE-2018-1117
PUBLISHED: 2018-06-20
ovirt-ansible-roles before version 1.0.6 has a vulnerability due to a missing no_log directive, resulting in the 'Add oVirt Provider to ManageIQ/CloudForms' playbook inadvertently disclosing admin passwords in the provisioning log. In an environment where logs are shared with other parties, this cou...
CVE-2018-11701
PUBLISHED: 2018-06-20
FastStone Image Viewer 6.2 has a User Mode Write AV at 0x005cb509, triggered when the user opens a malformed JPEG file that is mishandled by FSViewer.exe. Attackers could exploit this issue for DoS (Access Violation) or possibly unspecified other impact.
CVE-2018-11702
PUBLISHED: 2018-06-20
FastStone Image Viewer 6.2 has a User Mode Write AV at 0x00578cb3, triggered when the user opens a malformed JPEG file that is mishandled by FSViewer.exe. Attackers could exploit this issue for DoS (Access Violation) or possibly unspecified other impact.
CVE-2018-11703
PUBLISHED: 2018-06-20
FastStone Image Viewer 6.2 has a User Mode Write AV at 0x00402d6a, triggered when the user opens a malformed JPEG file that is mishandled by FSViewer.exe. Attackers could exploit this issue for DoS (Access Violation) or possibly unspecified other impact.