IoT

Researcher Cracks San Francisco's Emergency Siren System

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Bastille's director of vulnerability research, Balint Seeber discusses the process of creating SirenJack and cracking one of a city's critical safety systems. Filmed at Dark Reading News Desk at Black Hat USA 2018.

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donaldrobbinss
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donaldrobbinss,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/3/2018 | 1:41:14 PM
Re: Good man, pointing out weak security.
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A96.uk
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A96.uk,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/28/2018 | 3:15:38 AM
Good man, pointing out weak security.
I also showed how to clone on TTN with LoRaWAN a year or two back.

LoRaWAN uses very poor secuirty using symmetric keys when asymmetric in hardware is required.

Massive IoT systems have been deployeed all over the world using this very poor security.

Cloning is easy and the current system does not know the difference.

TTN forum people could not understand what i was showing them, all fools.

 

I told the VP of Semtech about this and they sent me £2000 of kit to test.

LoRaWAN security design is broken, but they all dont want to talk about it.

 

I think the NSA told LoRaWAN design team , they must have access to all IoT devices & AES keys.

So now they have a database of AES keys!

I told them no one in security stores AES keys in a database.

 

I pointed to SAML11 for their education and the 508a/608a from Microchip.

 

Now most people using LoRaWAN think its safe as they are all sheep.

They all trust software security far to much, like idiot's they all are.

 

If only a BLACK HAT researcher would look into LoRaWAN security!

I have only 30 years experience under my belt, i used to work for bank security also.

 
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