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Back to Basics: AI Isn't the Answer to What Ails Us in Cyber
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BrianN060
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BrianN060,
User Rank: Ninja
2/9/2018 | 12:13:31 PM
A few more points
A good article, with several important best practices. 

As for AI (Artificial Intelligence), it's an unfortunate choice for a label, for something that is actually a dynamic artifact of collective human intelligence.  You're right about the effective PR. 

You can add a couple of more items to your best practices list:
  • Limit data access, and type of access, on a needs basis.  If a knowledge worker doesn't require access of a particular kind, and from a particular source, in order to do their job, they shouldn't have it.
  • Know what data you have.  Very hard to tell if something is missing or has been altered, if you don't know what you have, and where it is.
  • Limit the proliferation of data.  Yes, you need a well thought out plan to recover compromised data; but more backup copies doesn't equate to more security - just the opposite.  Also, limit the data used for analysis, using the same needs-based criteria mentioned above.  Part of that is not running analysis directly on line-of-business/transactional data. 

Each of these goals is easier to implement if your organization uses the proper modeling methodologies. 


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