Comments
Researcher Cracks San Francisco's Emergency Siren System
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
donaldrobbinss
50%
50%
donaldrobbinss,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/3/2018 | 1:41:14 PM
Re: Good man, pointing out weak security.
like
A96.uk
100%
0%
A96.uk,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/28/2018 | 3:15:38 AM
Good man, pointing out weak security.
I also showed how to clone on TTN with LoRaWAN a year or two back.

LoRaWAN uses very poor secuirty using symmetric keys when asymmetric in hardware is required.

Massive IoT systems have been deployeed all over the world using this very poor security.

Cloning is easy and the current system does not know the difference.

TTN forum people could not understand what i was showing them, all fools.

 

I told the VP of Semtech about this and they sent me £2000 of kit to test.

LoRaWAN security design is broken, but they all dont want to talk about it.

 

I think the NSA told LoRaWAN design team , they must have access to all IoT devices & AES keys.

So now they have a database of AES keys!

I told them no one in security stores AES keys in a database.

 

I pointed to SAML11 for their education and the 508a/608a from Microchip.

 

Now most people using LoRaWAN think its safe as they are all sheep.

They all trust software security far to much, like idiot's they all are.

 

If only a BLACK HAT researcher would look into LoRaWAN security!

I have only 30 years experience under my belt, i used to work for bank security also.

 


Crowdsourced vs. Traditional Pen Testing
Alex Haynes, Chief Information Security Officer, CDL,  3/19/2019
BEC Scammer Pleads Guilty
Dark Reading Staff 3/20/2019
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Write a Caption, Win a Starbucks Card! Click Here
Latest Comment: This comment is waiting for review by our moderators.
Current Issue
5 Emerging Cyber Threats to Watch for in 2019
Online attackers are constantly developing new, innovative ways to break into the enterprise. This Dark Reading Tech Digest gives an in-depth look at five emerging attack trends and exploits your security team should look out for, along with helpful recommendations on how you can prevent your organization from falling victim.
Flash Poll
The State of Cyber Security Incident Response
The State of Cyber Security Incident Response
Organizations are responding to new threats with new processes for detecting and mitigating them. Here's a look at how the discipline of incident response is evolving.
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2018-18913
PUBLISHED: 2019-03-21
Opera before 57.0.3098.106 is vulnerable to a DLL Search Order hijacking attack where an attacker can send a ZIP archive composed of an HTML page along with a malicious DLL to the target. Once the document is opened, it may allow the attacker to take full control of the system from any location with...
CVE-2018-20031
PUBLISHED: 2019-03-21
A Denial of Service vulnerability related to preemptive item deletion in lmgrd and vendor daemon components of FlexNet Publisher version 11.16.1.0 and earlier allows a remote attacker to send a combination of messages to lmgrd or the vendor daemon, causing the heartbeat between lmgrd and the vendor ...
CVE-2018-20032
PUBLISHED: 2019-03-21
A Denial of Service vulnerability related to message decoding in lmgrd and vendor daemon components of FlexNet Publisher version 11.16.1.0 and earlier allows a remote attacker to send a combination of messages to lmgrd or the vendor daemon, causing the heartbeat between lmgrd and the vendor daemon t...
CVE-2018-20034
PUBLISHED: 2019-03-21
A Denial of Service vulnerability related to adding an item to a list in lmgrd and vendor daemon components of FlexNet Publisher version 11.16.1.0 and earlier allows a remote attacker to send a combination of messages to lmgrd or the vendor daemon, causing the heartbeat between lmgrd and the vendor ...
CVE-2019-3855
PUBLISHED: 2019-03-21
An integer overflow flaw which could lead to an out of bounds write was discovered in libssh2 before 1.8.1 in the way packets are read from the server. A remote attacker who compromises a SSH server may be able to execute code on the client system when a user connects to the server.