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Why the CISSP Remains Relevant to Cybersecurity After 28 Years
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paul.dittrich
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paul.dittrich,
User Rank: Strategist
11/9/2018 | 2:33:27 PM
Re: Security Fundamentals Aren't Changing
True - the fundamentals have not changed and nearly every organization would benefit from a review and re-emphasis of those fundamentals.

But neither can we lose sight of the fact that today's Internet is really just a large experiment that grew wildly out of control and has long since escaped the laboratory.  The early ARPAnet pioneers weren't thinking about security - they were too busy trying to figure out the basic communications between systems.  Many of today's problems are directly traceable to a couple of dozen scientists and engineers who knew each other at least casually and who never envisioned the rapid global expansion of their experiment.  In the days when every single email address in existence fit easily on one side of a standard sheet of paper, nobody was concerned about identity theft or malware.

Yes the fundamentals are still completely necessary.  But they cannot be the entire solution.  When the underlying technologies which built the Internet are inherently insecure, we need more than fixing current software.
neutronneedle
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neutronneedle,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/8/2018 | 1:34:12 PM
Security Fundamentals Aren't Changing
The work the CISSP certification is based on was performed in the late 60s and early 70s when it was "discovered" that only trust of the Systems staff wasn't adequate security protection.

Fundamentals are fundamentals. I have a chemistry professor friend who puts it this way in her field, "The Periodic Table of the Elements hasn't changed much lately."

The real area of concern should be, why are we still not caught up with the security processes of those early mainframe days?

One might also ask a similar question about the engineering quality of software in many devices attached to the internet these days. We could be asking ourselves, "If we don't have time to do it right the first time, when will we have time to redo it?"

We could also ask, "How will we undo/extract the damage done from putting that defective software out there in the first place?"


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