Mobile

10/13/2017
04:55 PM
50%
50%

DoubleLocker Delivers Unique Two-Punch Hit to Android

Combines Android ransomware with capability to change users device PINs.

Android users downloading a fake Adobe Flash Player from a malicious website may find themselves victimized by a unique strain of Android ransomware called DoubleLocker, ESET researchers disclosed today.

DoubleLocker, which was discovered in the wirld in August, will not only encrypt users' Android device data, but it takes the additional step of changing the device PIN, according to Lukas Stefanko, ESET malware researcher.

"The most interesting thing here is that it uses a dangerous combination of three aspects we have not seen before: accessibility services, which performs a click on the user's behalf; it encrypts data; and it can reset a PIN for a user's device," Stefanko told Dark Reading.

DoubleLocker was created based on mobile banking malware that misuses accessibility services to gain control over the infected device.

The bogus Adobe Flash player, asks to activate a bogus version of "Google Play Service" through the malware's accessibility service. 

"There are no exploited vulnerabilities, they're just using the system as it is designed," Stefanko says.

Once DoubleLocker secures accessibility permissions, it leverages them to snag administrator rights for the device and establishes itself as the default Home application without the user's approval.

As the default home app, or launcher, DoubleLocker is activated after the user presses the home button. It then changes the PIN and sets it to a random value that is not stored on the device or sent out, according to ESET's report. As a result, neither the user or security teams can recover the PIN. If a user pays the ransom, the attacker remotely resets the PIN and unlocks the device.

DoubleLocker can also act as traditional ransomware and encrypt files in the primary storage directory on the device. Users will realize they have been attacked if they find the ".cryeye" filename extension, according to ESET.

To Pay or Not to Pay

DoubleLocker demands 0.0130 Bitcon, or roughly $54, in ransom, and victims are ordered to make a payment within 24 hours. If they do so, they get their data back.

Meanwhile, there is a way to reset a hijacked PIN, according to ESET's report.

Devices that have not been rooted and are without a mobile device management system that can reset the PIN can be restored with a factory reset. While that will remove the PIN lock screen, it will also delete whatever data was on the device.

For devices that are rooted and have debugging enabled in the settings, a user can connect the device by the Android Debug Bridge (ADB) and remove the file where the PIN is stored, ESET advises.

Join Dark Reading LIVE for two days of practical cyber defense discussions. Learn from the industry’s most knowledgeable IT security experts. Check out the INsecurity agenda here.

Related Content:

 

Dawn Kawamoto is an Associate Editor for Dark Reading, where she covers cybersecurity news and trends. She is an award-winning journalist who has written and edited technology, management, leadership, career, finance, and innovation stories for such publications as CNET's ... View Full Bio

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
johnp140
100%
0%
johnp140,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/16/2018 | 2:31:36 AM
DoubleLocker
Malware specialists have recently found another variant of Android infection that may fill in as a saving money trojan and versatile ransomware. Known as DoubleLocker, malware, is by all accounts identified with Erricson Routers Customer Service the Svpeng keeping money trojan. Be that as it may, this pernicious program is by all accounts more advanced.
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Current Issue
The Year in Security 2018
This Dark Reading Tech Digest explores the biggest news stories of 2018 that shaped the cybersecurity landscape.
Flash Poll
How Enterprises Are Attacking the Cybersecurity Problem
How Enterprises Are Attacking the Cybersecurity Problem
Data breach fears and the need to comply with regulations such as GDPR are two major drivers increased spending on security products and technologies. But other factors are contributing to the trend as well. Find out more about how enterprises are attacking the cybersecurity problem by reading our report today.
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2018-6345
PUBLISHED: 2019-01-15
The function number_format is vulnerable to a heap overflow issue when its second argument ($dec_points) is excessively large. The internal implementation of the function will cause a string to be created with an invalid length, which can then interact poorly with other functions. This affects all s...
CVE-2018-7603
PUBLISHED: 2019-01-15
In Drupal's 3rd party module search auto complete prior to versions 7.x-4.8 there is a Cross Site Scripting vulnerability. This Search Autocomplete module enables you to autocomplete textfield using data from your website (nodes, comments, etc.). The module doesn't sufficiently filter user-entered t...
CVE-2019-3554
PUBLISHED: 2019-01-15
Wangle's AcceptRoutingHandler incorrectly casts a socket when accepting a TLS 1.3 connection, leading to a potential denial of service attack against systems accepting such connections. This affects versions of Wangle prior to v2019.01.14.00
CVE-2019-3557
PUBLISHED: 2019-01-15
The implementations of streams for bz2 and php://output improperly implemented their readImpl functions, returning -1 consistently. This behavior caused some stream functions, such as stream_get_line, to trigger an out-of-bounds read when operating on such malformed streams. The implementations were...
CVE-2019-0030
PUBLISHED: 2019-01-15
Juniper ATP uses DES and a hardcoded salt for password hashing, allowing for trivial de-hashing of the password file contents. This issue affects Juniper ATP 5.0 versions prior to 5.0.3.