Risk

11/26/2018
09:00 AM
100%
0%

7 Real-Life Dangers That Threaten Cybersecurity

Cybersecurity means more than bits and bytes; threats are out there IRL, and IT pros need to be prepared.
Previous
1 of 8
Next

Cybersecurity tends to focus on dangers that appear on networks or in messages. The attackers may be half a world away, so the threat is the only thing that matters. But what happens when the threat actor is walking through the front door or sitting next to you at an airport coffee shop? Firewall rules and DNSSec can have minimal impact on the thief sliding a company-owned laptop into his backpack and walking out the door.

"If we all took our computers, encased them in concrete, and dropped them into the middle of the Atlantic Ocean, nobody would ever steal our data, but it wouldn't matter because our data would be on the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean," says Tim Callan, senior fellow at Sectigo. The challenge, he says, is reconciling physical security with the fact that people need to use their computers and mobile devices for legitimate work.

In 2016, Bitglass reported that one in four breaches in the financial services sector were due to lost or stolen devices, while one in five were the result of hacking. Physical security might not have the glamour of fighting malware writers, but there's no question it's a serious component of any effective data protection program.

So what are the physical dangers to enterprise data? Several, but they tend to echo the dangers to any physical assets an organization owns. As a result, some IT security groups leave physical security to the physical-plant security force, but there are both strategic and technical reasons to involve IT security in protecting both the data on systems and the hardware that surrounds those precious bytes.

After talking with security professionals, querying the security community via Twitter, and looking at major security incidents from the recent past, we've put together a list of seven threats that definitely deserve attention. Protecting systems from these threats takes a combination of user education, behavior modification, and technology, but remedying the problems themselves can make a huge difference in an organization's risk profile.

(Image: Stevepb)

 

Curtis Franklin Jr. is Senior Editor at Dark Reading. In this role he focuses on product and technology coverage for the publication. In addition he works on audio and video programming for Dark Reading and contributes to activities at Interop ITX, Black Hat, INsecurity, and ... View Full Bio

Previous
1 of 8
Next
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
mattsweet
50%
50%
mattsweet,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/28/2018 | 12:15:00 PM
Re: USB tracking
We track files being written and read on USB drives through an agent connected to our SIEM server (we use Solarwinds LEM, but there are others as well.) We can also monitor machines that have restricted USB access.
REISEN1955
100%
0%
REISEN1955,
User Rank: Ninja
11/27/2018 | 9:53:55 AM
Re: USB tracking
Last year, my wife - daughter and 3 year old grand-daughter, Cariana, visited my office.  She had pizza in the cafeteria, met my colleagues and WHEN LEAVING ..... Cariana pulled all of our security badges, save mine, and said THESE MUST BE RETURNED.   She then walked them to the security desk to hand them in.  Staff there was delighted!!!   Lesson - A THREE YEAR OLD understood perimeter security BETTER than most employees do. 
lakers85
100%
0%
lakers85,
User Rank: Strategist
11/26/2018 | 1:14:46 PM
USB tracking
We have a domain policy that forces BitLocker to be used before saving data to any usb drive, otherwise its will be read only. I guess my questions is, how do you track or monitor usb activity on our 1500 end clients?

Thanks
Devastating Cyberattack on Email Provider Destroys 18 Years of Data
Jai Vijayan, Freelance writer,  2/12/2019
Up to 100,000 Reported Affected in Landmark White Data Breach
Kelly Sheridan, Staff Editor, Dark Reading,  2/12/2019
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon
Current Issue
5 Emerging Cyber Threats to Watch for in 2019
Online attackers are constantly developing new, innovative ways to break into the enterprise. This Dark Reading Tech Digest gives an in-depth look at five emerging attack trends and exploits your security team should look out for, along with helpful recommendations on how you can prevent your organization from falling victim.
Flash Poll
How Enterprises Are Attacking the Cybersecurity Problem
How Enterprises Are Attacking the Cybersecurity Problem
Data breach fears and the need to comply with regulations such as GDPR are two major drivers increased spending on security products and technologies. But other factors are contributing to the trend as well. Find out more about how enterprises are attacking the cybersecurity problem by reading our report today.
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2019-8354
PUBLISHED: 2019-02-15
An issue was discovered in SoX 14.4.2. lsx_make_lpf in effect_i_dsp.c has an integer overflow on the result of multiplication fed into malloc. When the buffer is allocated, it is smaller than expected, leading to a heap-based buffer overflow.
CVE-2019-8355
PUBLISHED: 2019-02-15
An issue was discovered in SoX 14.4.2. In xmalloc.h, there is an integer overflow on the result of multiplication fed into the lsx_valloc macro that wraps malloc. When the buffer is allocated, it is smaller than expected, leading to a heap-based buffer overflow in channels_start in remix.c.
CVE-2019-8356
PUBLISHED: 2019-02-15
An issue was discovered in SoX 14.4.2. One of the arguments to bitrv2 in fft4g.c is not guarded, such that it can lead to write access outside of the statically declared array, aka a stack-based buffer overflow.
CVE-2019-8357
PUBLISHED: 2019-02-15
An issue was discovered in SoX 14.4.2. lsx_make_lpf in effect_i_dsp.c allows a NULL pointer dereference.
CVE-2013-2516
PUBLISHED: 2019-02-15
Vulnerability in FileUtils v0.7, Ruby Gem Fileutils <= v0.7 Command Injection vulnerability in user supplied url variable that is passed to the shell.