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Threat Intelligence

12/27/2018
11:30 AM
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IoT Bug Grants Access to Home Video Surveillance

Due to a shared Amazon S3 credential, all users of a certain model of the Guardzilla All-In-One Video Security System can view each other's videos.

A vulnerability in the Guardzilla All-In-One Video Security System, an IoT-enabled home video surveillance system, lets all users view one another's saved surveillance footage due to the design and implementation of Amazon S3 credentials inside the camera's firmware.

Security researchers found the bug (CVE-2018-5560) during an event held by 0DayAllDay and reported it to Rapid7 for coordinated disclosure. Rapid7 published the flaw today, 60 days after it first attempted to contact the vendor. Multiple coordination efforts received no response.

This vulnerability is an issue of CWE-798: Use of Hard-coded Credentials, 0DayAllDay researchers report. Guardzilla's system uses a shared Amazon S3 credential for storing users' saved videos. When they investigated the access rights given to the embedded S3 credentials, researchers found they provide unlimited access to all S3 buckets provisioned for the account.

As a result, all people who use Guardzilla's system for home surveillance can view one another's video data in the cloud. Once the password is known, any unauthenticated person can access and download stored files and videos in buckets linked to the account.

Researchers only tested Model #GZ521W of the Guardzilla Security Video System and do not know whether other models are affected by the same bug, Rapid7 reports. Without a patch, users should ensure that the device's cloud-based data storage functions are turned off.

Read more details in Rapid7's blog here.

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Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
1/8/2019 | 7:04:31 PM
Re: more of the same
@RyanSepe: I have heard from highly regulated entities that they have experiences with cloud vendors with 360-degree auditing -- i.e., that in addition to auditing the vendor, the vendor audits the customer to ensure that they are doing what they need to do to be secure while using their platform. A great example of teamwork -- and it would be a great way to prevent the kind of brand damage AWS has suffered from this kind of thing.

Of course, one of AWS's biggest selling points is its accessibility for even the smallest of businesses/entities -- so that's pretty impractical (at least, at the personalized level) for AWS for its smaller clients.
RyanSepe
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50%
RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
1/2/2019 | 2:52:32 PM
Re: more of the same
Agree 100%. I think its a tragic principle of a lack of education. By that I mean, Amazon does a great job to ensure that they configure their product to be a secure iteration by default. (Not overly stringent, but gets the job done) Unfortunately, it is then handed off to a NON-Amazon entity (corporate IT entity) who may not be overly familiar with how the S3 bucket is set up. By default this will restrict them from performing the function they need to support the business, so what will they do? They will remove the safeguards to allow them to do said function. In the process, removing any secure configuration they may have had. 
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
12/31/2018 | 10:46:46 PM
more of the same
Geezalou, another freakin' gross misconfiguration of S3-bucket access. This has been a huge trend over the past couple of years (despite the fact that the default settings tend to be more secure) -- to the point that AWS has had to change their UI a little.

I expect the trend to continue. Stupidity doesn't just end.
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