Threat Intelligence

11/22/2017
10:00 AM
50%
50%

Samsung Pay Leaks Mobile Device Information

Researcher at Black Hat Europe will show how Samsung Pay's security falls short and ways attackers could potentially bypass it.

Mobile users installing Samsung Pay on their devices could have sensitive information stolen by attackers due to a newly discovered weakness in the app that leaks the digital tokens that secure transactions and other technical information such as network traffic logs.

An attacker could capture this information without having to authenticate to the device, according to a Tencent researcher who goes by the name of HC, who at Black Hat Europe 2017 next month will present his findings on the Samsung Pay security weaknesses.

"This information can let the attacker learn much more about the internal mechanisms of Samsung Pay and allow them to use it to their advantage to go even deeper into Samsung Pay," HC says.

The attacker, for example, could take the information and use it to view communication between users and their banks in plain text. With enough information, HC notes, an attacker could create another token to withdraw money from users' bank accounts.

Samsung Pay's tokens are unique alphanumeric identifiers generated via algorithms and designed to eliminate the need to use a credit card or debit card number.

"This is not a vulnerability in Samsung Pay, but a mistake in Samsung Pay's app. The mistake is you don't need privileges to get access to the phone log system," says HC, who has notified Samsung about the issue.

HC conducted his research using a Samsung Galaxy S6 but says all Samsung Galaxy smartphones that feature Samsung Pay may be at risk.

The purpose of HC's presentation is to discuss Samsung Pay's security and how to generate a token without the device being physically present, which is different than a 2016 Black Hat Samsung Pay demonstration by another security researcher, HC notes.

Although HC in his research had aimed to generate a token without a Samsung Galaxy device, he acknowledged he was not able to achieve that goal because of the strength of the encrypted traffic and difficulty in accessing the secure chip to crack the encrypted key.

"It is possible to compromise Samsung Pay with the right tools and skills," HC says, noting in his particular case the desired tools were not immediately available.

Related Content:

 

Join Dark Reading LIVE for two days of practical cyber defense discussions. Learn from the industry’s most knowledgeable IT security experts. Check out the INsecurity agenda here.

Dawn Kawamoto is an Associate Editor for Dark Reading, where she covers cybersecurity news and trends. She is an award-winning journalist who has written and edited technology, management, leadership, career, finance, and innovation stories for such publications as CNET's ... View Full Bio

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Higher Education: 15 Books to Help Cybersecurity Pros Be Better
Curtis Franklin Jr., Senior Editor at Dark Reading,  12/12/2018
Worst Password Blunders of 2018 Hit Organizations East and West
Curtis Franklin Jr., Senior Editor at Dark Reading,  12/12/2018
2019 Attacker Playbook
Ericka Chickowski, Contributing Writer, Dark Reading,  12/14/2018
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Current Issue
The Year in Security 2018
This Dark Reading Tech Digest explores the biggest news stories of 2018 that shaped the cybersecurity landscape.
Flash Poll
[Sponsored Content] The State of Encryption and How to Improve It
[Sponsored Content] The State of Encryption and How to Improve It
Encryption and access controls are considered to be the ultimate safeguards to ensure the security and confidentiality of data, which is why they're mandated in so many compliance and regulatory standards. While the cybersecurity market boasts a wide variety of encryption technologies, many data breaches reveal that sensitive and personal data has often been left unencrypted and, therefore, vulnerable.
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2018-20228
PUBLISHED: 2018-12-19
Subsonic V6.1.5 allows internetRadioSettings.view streamUrl CSRF, with resultant SSRF.
CVE-2018-20230
PUBLISHED: 2018-12-19
An issue was discovered in PSPP 1.2.0. There is a heap-based buffer overflow at the function read_bytes_internal in utilities/pspp-dump-sav.c, which allows attackers to cause a denial of service (application crash) or possibly have unspecified other impact.
CVE-2018-20231
PUBLISHED: 2018-12-19
Cross Site Request Forgery (CSRF) in the two-factor-authentication plugin before 1.3.13 for WordPress allows remote attackers to disable 2FA via the tfa_enable_tfa parameter due to missing nonce validation.
CVE-2018-20227
PUBLISHED: 2018-12-19
RDF4J 2.4.2 allows Directory Traversal via ../ in an entry in a ZIP archive.
CVE-2018-19790
PUBLISHED: 2018-12-18
An open redirect was discovered in Symfony 2.7.x before 2.7.50, 2.8.x before 2.8.49, 3.x before 3.4.20, 4.0.x before 4.0.15, 4.1.x before 4.1.9 and 4.2.x before 4.2.1. By using backslashes in the `_failure_path` input field of login forms, an attacker can work around the redirection target restricti...