Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Vulnerabilities / Threats

Zeus 'Gameover' Trojan Expands Global Reach

Cybercrime clients configure juggernaut Gameover variant of banking Trojan to reach bank customers in new countries.

Customers of the crimeware-as-a-service syndicate behind the "Gameover" variant of the venerable Zeus banking Trojan have been customizing the malware to steal data from a number of new banking sites.

Denmark-based CSIS Security Group sounded that warning Wednesday, reporting that the number of unique targets for Zeus web injection capabilities has recently increased by 38% -- from 1,097 at the beginning of 2014, to 1,515 at the end of March.

Using web injection allows Zeus -- like many other types of malware -- to hook into Windows processes and gain raw access to HTTP data traveling over the network. Zeus then modifies that HTTP data, for example to surreptitiously make bank transfers in the background while showing users a normal-looking banking website page.

According to a report issued last year by Poland's Computer Emergency Response Team (CERT Polska), Zeus can compare a visited site's URL with a preset list, and then execute predefined actions, which are either contained in a configuration file or retrieved from an external server by using a peer-to-peer (P2P) proxy to disguise related communications. These actions can include recording data or making screenshots, for example to capture banking website login codes for sites that require customers to employ onscreen keyboards.

[Perfect security is impossible -- think about consequence management instead. See Dispelling The Myths Of Cyber Security.]

The abuse.ch Zeus Tracker reports that there are currently about 450 Zeus command-and-control servers online, and the average anti-malware detection rate for Zeus binaries is only about 40%. According to CSIS, various versions of Zeus are thought to infect and control a few million PCs around the world. The ongoing use of Zeus has been driven in part by the malware source code getting leaked in 2011.

Unlike many Zeus operators, however, the gang behind Gameover doesn't sell their version of the code directly, but instead allows customers to lease the botnet for their attacks. In the past, the group has also tapped some third-party malicious infrastructure, including using the Cutwail spamming botnet to distribute related malware.

Historically, Zeus-using online criminals have tended to focus their efforts on better-known banks, especially in the United States, Canada, and Western Europe. But according to Peter Kruse, a security specialist at CSIS Security Group, Gameover's user base has recently been launching attacks against customers of financial services firms and other organizations for the first time. "Amongst the 'new countries' being significantly targeted by this malware family we are seeing: South Africa, Nigeria, India, Singapore, Turkey, UAE, Saudi Arabia, Australia, Croatia, Greece, but in general we are seeing brands from all over the world being attacked," he said in a blog post.

Gameover's geographic expansion has been facilitated by its developers giving their crimeware-as-a-service (CaaS) customers the ability to customize and tweak related configuration profiles to their liking. "The malware also includes a basic ZeuS webinject template, but each customer in the ZeuS P2P CaaS can modify and add new advanced webinjects and increase the number of targets," Kruse said.

Enabling Gameover to be used in new markets -- even if they offer less bang for the buck than existing, higher-net-worth banking customer targets -- makes economic sense. For starters, the customizations allow criminals to use Gameover to attack local banks and generate new sources of revenue. Likewise, every new customer that leases the malware helps increase the profits for the Gameover gang, at least some of which they'll plow back into research and development to help attract future cybercrime customers.

Mathew Schwartz served as the InformationWeek information security reporter from 2010 until mid-2014. View Full Bio

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
macker490
50%
50%
macker490,
User Rank: Ninja
5/24/2014 | 7:36:59 AM
Protect the Software First
For Computer Security you must protect the software first.   Until un-authorized programming such as ZEUS arxe excluded and verified excluded -- there can be no meaningful discussion of "Computer Security". The term "Computer Security" will remain an oxymoron and the game of whac-a-mole will continue.

only the OS OEM can protect the operating software and that must be protected first.  It is the OS that protects the application software -- through memory protection and privileged instructions.  These asre implemented in the hardware.   The OS runs in "kernel mode" (RING0) while applications run in User Mode (RING3).

in User mode a program cannot modify the OS -- unless the OS allows it.    such permission should be granted only with the approval of the operator and only where the operator is administrator.

we have a real mess to clean up.
Data Leak Week: Billions of Sensitive Files Exposed Online
Kelly Jackson Higgins, Executive Editor at Dark Reading,  12/10/2019
Intel Issues Fix for 'Plundervolt' SGX Flaw
Kelly Jackson Higgins, Executive Editor at Dark Reading,  12/11/2019
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon
Current Issue
The Year in Security: 2019
This Tech Digest provides a wrap up and overview of the year's top cybersecurity news stories. It was a year of new twists on old threats, with fears of another WannaCry-type worm and of a possible botnet army of Wi-Fi routers. But 2019 also underscored the risk of firmware and trusted security tools harboring dangerous holes that cybercriminals and nation-state hackers could readily abuse. Read more.
Flash Poll
Rethinking Enterprise Data Defense
Rethinking Enterprise Data Defense
Frustrated with recurring intrusions and breaches, cybersecurity professionals are questioning some of the industrys conventional wisdom. Heres a look at what theyre thinking about.
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2019-5252
PUBLISHED: 2019-12-14
There is an improper authentication vulnerability in Huawei smartphones (Y9, Honor 8X, Honor 9 Lite, Honor 9i, Y6 Pro). The applock does not perform a sufficient authentication in a rare condition. Successful exploit could allow the attacker to use the application locked by applock in an instant.
CVE-2019-5235
PUBLISHED: 2019-12-14
Some Huawei smart phones have a null pointer dereference vulnerability. An attacker crafts specific packets and sends to the affected product to exploit this vulnerability. Successful exploitation may cause the affected phone to be abnormal.
CVE-2019-5264
PUBLISHED: 2019-12-13
There is an information disclosure vulnerability in certain Huawei smartphones (Mate 10;Mate 10 Pro;Honor V10;Changxiang 7S;P-smart;Changxiang 8 Plus;Y9 2018;Honor 9 Lite;Honor 9i;Mate 9). The software does not properly handle certain information of applications locked by applock in a rare condition...
CVE-2019-5277
PUBLISHED: 2019-12-13
Huawei CloudUSM-EUA V600R006C10;V600R019C00 have an information leak vulnerability. Due to improper configuration, the attacker may cause information leak by successful exploitation.
CVE-2019-5254
PUBLISHED: 2019-12-13
Certain Huawei products (AP2000;IPS Module;NGFW Module;NIP6300;NIP6600;NIP6800;S5700;SVN5600;SVN5800;SVN5800-C;SeMG9811;Secospace AntiDDoS8000;Secospace USG6300;Secospace USG6500;Secospace USG6600;USG6000V;eSpace U1981) have an out-of-bounds read vulnerability. An attacker who logs in to the board m...