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10/31/2018
02:00 PM
Kelly Sheridan
Kelly Sheridan
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9 Traits of A Strong Infosec Resume

Security experts share insights on which skills and experiences are most helpful to job hunters looking for their next gig.
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1. Show Your Whole Story
Regardless of the position you're going for, your resume should reflect what duties you owned in every job. In addition to showing what your team did, explain how you helped the group achieve its goals. What did you take ownership of? How did you help drive success?
'Having a clear, concise resume that effectively summarizes what you as a person were responsible for is critical,' says Drew Fearson, chief operating officer at NinjaJobs.
(Image: Slonme - stock.adobe.com)

1. Show Your Whole Story

Regardless of the position you're going for, your resume should reflect what duties you owned in every job. In addition to showing what your team did, explain how you helped the group achieve its goals. What did you take ownership of? How did you help drive success?

"Having a clear, concise resume that effectively summarizes what you as a person were responsible for is critical," says Drew Fearson, chief operating officer at NinjaJobs.

(Image: Slonme stock.adobe.com)

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enhayden1321
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enhayden1321,
User Rank: Strategist
11/3/2018 | 2:25:37 PM
Demonstrate Your Communication Skills
The article is interesting but missing a key element.  It is an imperative that the security professional is a strong communicator.  This includes verbal and written skills that demonstrate you know how to write complete sentences, develop arguments, and can speak to the issue at hand.  Also, you need to have very strong skills with the Microsoft suite of Word, PowerPoint, and Excel.  If you cannot effectively communicate then you will not be a solid security professional.  Thank you.
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