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Attacks/Breaches

Fresh Target Breach Cards Hitting Black Market

A Bitcoin-powered marketplace is selling stolen card data in small batches, offering card validity guarantees, an RSA presentation reveals.

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Alison_Diana
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Alison_Diana,
User Rank: Moderator
2/28/2014 | 1:04:31 PM
Not Only Credit Cards
In the past week, I received a call about my "Microsoft Windows software" and another from "XYZ Bank's collection agency." Both, of course, were scams. I laughed at the first guy but was a bit concerned for a couple of minutes by the voicemail from the second until commonsense kicked in.
danielcawrey
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danielcawrey,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/1/2014 | 1:57:03 PM
Re: Not Only Credit Cards

This is scary. The level of "service" that Valid Shop is offering is a bit disturbing. I guess that even illegal marketplaces need to serve their customers well, or else people will not pay them. 

This is another unfortunate example of people using bitcoin for nefarious purposes. Bitcoin has many positive aspects, but its pseudononymous nature is causing it to be used as a tool for criminality. 

Brian.Dean
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Brian.Dean,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/2/2014 | 9:32:37 AM
Re: Not Only Credit Cards
The Microsoft scam support call is amusing to think about, someone actually thinks that by making such calls and investing time and money consumers are going to fall prey to the scam. The scary bit is that they are still operational, which means that they are people falling for the scam -- generating revenue. Otherwise they would not be attempting such a scam. The idea that a company will provide a high level of customer support is appealing to customers, but from the article we can see that when support and protection requires investment then firms choose the wait-and-see approach (risk management).
Michael Endler
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Michael Endler,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/3/2014 | 3:50:50 PM
Re: Not Only Credit Cards
I wonder if it's the same "Microsoft Windows software" guy who called me twice last month.

"Hackers are trying to hack into your PC, really bad," he said. I proceeded to ask him which PC, which seemed to really confuse him. "What do you mean?" he asked. "I have more than one," I replied, at which point he hung up.

The next time, I decided to tell him he was full of BS, at which point he told me that if I wanted to let hackers take over my computer, it was on me. He hung up again.

If I weren't certain some people have fallen for it, the calls would have been pretty funny.
Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/28/2014 | 2:29:33 PM
Bottom line advice?
So the bottom line, Mat, is if you shopped at Target during the timeframe in question, you should insist now on a new card?
Mathew
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Mathew,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/28/2014 | 6:47:04 PM
Re: Bottom line advice?
Yes. If I'd shopped at Target during the breach window -- which I didn't -- and used a credit/debit card, I'd call the card issuer and demand a new card number. Failing that, I'd threaten to cancel the account, or change banks.

However long that new-card process takes, it's a good bet it will equal a lot less time than dealing with the mess caused by any resulting ID theft.
Brian.Dean
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Brian.Dean,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/2/2014 | 9:41:12 AM
Re: Bottom line advice?
Great advice and anyone who has been exposed to the breach window should call up the bank and say "that there is a 60% chance their card will be misused".
Jim Donahue
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Jim Donahue,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/28/2014 | 2:31:14 PM
Targeted
I got my first direct communication from Target about this situation only this week! That is remarkably bad.


Given I used only my Target card at the store during the affected time frame--not a general credit card--I can pretty easly keep tabs on how the card is being used, so I'm not terribly concerned. But I am surprised Target hasn't canceled its cards and issued new ones.
asksqn
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asksqn,
User Rank: Ninja
3/1/2014 | 7:10:12 PM
Target Breach: the gift that keeps giving
The really galling thing about this latest breach is that this kind of theft can be nixed if the credit card industry (and those biz that accept plastic) would simply upgrade its current PCI DSS to the same standard Europe uses. 
Brian.Dean
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Brian.Dean,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/2/2014 | 9:56:42 AM
Re: Target Breach: the gift that keeps giving
I think the cost of a card itself is not a big deal (even when multiplied by 40 million). The logistics of sending all those cards out and getting them activated is what's causing the apprehension. Since the breach has taken place and eventually new cards have to be issued, now would be a nice time to upgrade card security in the processes. By viewing this whole process as an upgrade to security rather than a containment exercise, better results can be gained.
Li Tan
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Li Tan,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/2/2014 | 8:29:35 PM
Re: Target Breach: the gift that keeps giving
I completely agree. The major issue is not about card itself but mainly the security process. Nowadays the card with magnetic strip is in use not upgraded to IC chip yet. Keeping your card with the reach of your eyesight help nothing to prevent security breach. Instead some solid process must be in place.
catvalencia
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catvalencia,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/5/2014 | 4:01:32 AM
Re: Target Breach: the gift that keeps giving
That's absolutely right. Such scenarios of financial pain and horror might cause you to wonder how you can keep yourself from becoming a credit card theft victim. One answer is to use payday loans rather than credit cards in emergency situations where you need quick cash, as the process does not generally expose you to potential identity theft. However, having a small number of credit cards can be beneficial to your FICO score (indicating diversity in your credit portfolio, which creditors like to see), so perhaps a better long-term answer would be how to make credit card usage less dangerous.
anon2815515591
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anon2815515591,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/14/2015 | 12:36:06 PM
Re: Target Breach: the gift that keeps giving
Remember if you log on to a site that sells stolen data a) the FBI may be watching and you may get wrapped up in the hoopla, and B) If they are the unscrupulous type and sell peoples cards do you think it would be easy for them to also monitor who connects and inject malware into the systems that are connecting??

Just a thought, I would make sure you use a public wifi connection not your house and also use a computer that is ready for the scrap heap then pull the hard disk out and junk it...DONT use the computer you surf the web for on a day to day or you may get something you didnt ask for.
rradina
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rradina,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/2/2014 | 8:55:59 PM
Re: Target Breach: the gift that keeps giving
Upgrade to what?  You cannot just change the card without changing the pin pads too.  You can add a chip in the card but as long as the local "Roach Coach" uses a Square plugged into an iPhone, old payment methods have to be allowed.  How are on-line sites more secure with new cards?  3-D Secure?  That doesn't require new cards.
Brian.Dean
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50%
Brian.Dean,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/4/2014 | 7:13:21 PM
Re: Target Breach: the gift that keeps giving
That's an excellent question: upgrade to what? Some of the most secure forms of transfer payments that I have heard about concerns NFC and mobile wallets -- card security has a lot of limitations. I think cards can be utilized by the average consumers for another good decade or so, if somehow payments required the users to enter a pin, so in the event that 40 million card information has been stolen then all a user would have to do to make their card secure again is to assign a new pin.

Upgrade is a process that we should not be overlooked, I have heard that some small retailers have been issued to upgrade their OS from XP (not because of the Target Breach, but because XP won't we officially supported) by their payment solution providers.  
Alison_Diana
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Alison_Diana,
User Rank: Moderator
3/3/2014 | 5:14:10 PM
Re: Target Breach: the gift that keeps giving
I agree. Financial institutions keep saying it's too expensive to change -- but surely all the costs associated with a breach like this approach the cost of changing over. Viewed as an upgrade, then it might be more palatable. And if banks do it voluntarily, then the government won't force it on them at some point.
WKash
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WKash,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/3/2014 | 9:19:05 PM
Protected
Interesting how credit card groups are saying you're protected if your card gets stolen. I just went through a fresh example of that -- and at least got what was promised:  Someone made off with my AMEX card.  I didn't discovere it for four days, by which time, the person ran up $2457 in credit cards purchases, mostly small stuff, where a credit card scan is all that's required.  Fortunately, AMEX credited all 30 charges.  But I would probably have not been as fortunate if I hadn't reported it.
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