Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Attacks/Breaches

9/19/2014
02:27 PM
100%
0%

Home Depot Breach Surpasses Target In Scope

New details have emerged about the breach affecting Home Depot, which exposed 56 million payment cards in stores in the US and Canada and utilized custom malware.

Home Depot just beat another major retailer -- but not in a way the company would like.

According to Home Depot, an investigation has revealed that the recent data breach put some 56 million credit and debit cards at risk, a number that far surpasses the roughly 40 million cards exposed in last year's attack on Target.

"Fifty-six million cards may not be as big as the huge Heartland Payment Systems breach, but it eclipses both the TJX and Target breaches, and that’s going to cost Home Depot a lot of money," says Trey Ford, global security strategist at Rapid7. "We can expect other large global retailers, such as Wal-Mart, Carrefour, Tesco, and Metro AG, will be paying close attention as the investigation continues."

Ford says this is why big-box retailers are fat targets for sophisticated attackers. "They are able to invest time in researching their targets to find a way into the network. Once they’re in, they stay quiet and fly unobserved under the radar, potentially for months at a time," he says. "It’s really hard for organizations to detect them in many cases because they can be using stolen account details and look like a bona fide user.  It’s well worth the planning and patience involved for the attacker when the potential pay day is this significant."

The criminals used custom-built malware to evade detection that Home Depot's security partners have not seen in previous breaches. The malware is believed to have been present between April and September.

One common thread in a number of breaches is a lack of configuration monitoring on point-of-sale terminals, says Steven Ransom-Jones, senior consultant at Neohapsis. "The Payment Card Industry requires the use of file integrity monitoring to detect unauthorized changes to servers that run in the cardholder processing environment," Ransom-Jones says. "The intent of this control is to stabilize a secure processing environment and identify the effects of changes, whether it is by malware or direct intervention (either by a hacker or an administrator circumventing a change management process).

"As payment terminals are dedicated to a single purpose… changes on these devices should be infrequent and managed through an appropriate management process and testing cycle. In this environment, integrity monitoring would be an extremely effective control: any change should be considered as suspicious and investigated immediately."

To protect data until the malware was eliminated, the Home Depot terminals identified as infected were taken out of service. The hackers' method of entry has been closed off, and the company has rolled out enhanced encryption of payment data to all US stores, according to Home Depot. Roll out of encryption to Canadian stores will be completed by early 2015. Canadian stores are already enabled with EMV Chip and PIN technology.

There is no evidence that customers' PINs were compromised in the attack, according to the company.

"We apologize to our customers for the inconvenience and anxiety this has caused, and want to reassure them that they will not be liable for fraudulent charges," says Frank Blake, chairman and CEO, in a statement. "From the time this investigation began, our guiding principle has been to put our customers first, and we will continue to do so."

Brian Prince is a freelance writer for a number of IT security-focused publications. Prior to becoming a freelance reporter, he worked at eWEEK for five years covering not only security, but also a variety of other subjects in the tech industry. Before that, he worked as a ... View Full Bio

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
ecowper
50%
50%
ecowper,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/1/2014 | 9:46:51 AM
Re: First order of business for a new CIO...
@GonzSTL – great point. Retail organizations need to better understand the threats they face, the vulnerabilities that exist and how the threats will exploit them. They need to think like attackers, not a PCI compliance team.
GonzSTL
50%
50%
GonzSTL,
User Rank: Ninja
9/22/2014 | 1:08:07 PM
Re: First order of business for a new CIO...
If I were to guess, it would be that this was another case of the "we should be secure because we were in compliance" scenario. If an organization started out by properly  implementing secure practices like the SANS 20 critical security controls, they can't help but be in compliance with PCI DSS. I realize that for large companies, this can be quite a big and expensive undertaking, but then again, the cost of a breach is certainly larger than that initial proactive expense. Reminds me of that old Fram commercial – " ... pay me now or pay me later".
RyanSepe
50%
50%
RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
9/22/2014 | 12:05:11 PM
Integrity Monitor and Baseline Analyzers
Baseline analyzers are sound security practice for any type of device/system that contains high priority data. Having your administrators sign-off on changes that are made assigns responsiblity and quick response if a change is made maliciously. I hope that in future years we see this type of methodology employed not only with POS devices but other high priority devices within the corporate network infrastructure.
Thomas Claburn
50%
50%
Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Ninja
9/22/2014 | 11:35:53 AM
Re: First order of business for a new CIO...
Particularly after Target's CIO resigned over a breach.
Stratustician
50%
50%
Stratustician,
User Rank: Moderator
9/22/2014 | 11:07:44 AM
Re: First order of business for a new CIO...
What gets me is that only now are they rolling out enhanced encryption.  Considering all these POS terminals do is handle payment information, it baffles my mind that it's not a consideration that these really should have been prioritized in the first place from a security perspective.  Especially when not only are they numerous when it comes to total number of endpoints, but since they sit outside the corporate perimeter, they're easily one of the easiest entry points.
Thomas Claburn
50%
50%
Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Ninja
9/19/2014 | 5:34:16 PM
First order of business for a new CIO...
...pen a resignation letter and put it in an envelope for when it's needed.
Aviation Faces Increasing Cybersecurity Scrutiny
Kelly Jackson Higgins, Executive Editor at Dark Reading,  8/22/2019
Microsoft Tops Phishers' Favorite Brands as Facebook Spikes
Kelly Sheridan, Staff Editor, Dark Reading,  8/22/2019
Capital One Breach: What Security Teams Can Do Now
Dr. Richard Gold, Head of Security Engineering at Digital Shadows,  8/23/2019
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon
Current Issue
7 Threats & Disruptive Forces Changing the Face of Cybersecurity
This Dark Reading Tech Digest gives an in-depth look at the biggest emerging threats and disruptive forces that are changing the face of cybersecurity today.
Flash Poll
The State of IT Operations and Cybersecurity Operations
The State of IT Operations and Cybersecurity Operations
Your enterprise's cyber risk may depend upon the relationship between the IT team and the security team. Heres some insight on what's working and what isn't in the data center.
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2016-6154
PUBLISHED: 2019-08-23
The authentication applet in Watchguard Fireware 11.11 Operating System has reflected XSS (this can also cause an open redirect).
CVE-2019-5594
PUBLISHED: 2019-08-23
An Improper Neutralization of Input During Web Page Generation ("Cross-site Scripting") in Fortinet FortiNAC 8.3.0 to 8.3.6 and 8.5.0 admin webUI may allow an unauthenticated attacker to perform a reflected XSS attack via the search field in the webUI.
CVE-2019-6695
PUBLISHED: 2019-08-23
Lack of root file system integrity checking in Fortinet FortiManager VM application images of all versions below 6.2.1 may allow an attacker to implant third-party programs by recreating the image through specific methods.
CVE-2019-12400
PUBLISHED: 2019-08-23
In version 2.0.3 Apache Santuario XML Security for Java, a caching mechanism was introduced to speed up creating new XML documents using a static pool of DocumentBuilders. However, if some untrusted code can register a malicious implementation with the thread context class loader first, then this im...
CVE-2019-15092
PUBLISHED: 2019-08-23
The webtoffee "WordPress Users & WooCommerce Customers Import Export" plugin 1.3.0 for WordPress allows CSV injection in the user_url, display_name, first_name, and last_name columns in an exported CSV file created by the WF_CustomerImpExpCsv_Exporter class.