theDocumentId => 1333261 Build Security into Container Deployment

Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Black Hat USA
July 31 - August 5, 2021
Las Vegas, NV, USA
SecTor
November 4 - October 30, 2021
Toronto, ON, Canada
Black Hat Europe
November 8-11, 2021
Virtual Event
11/5/2018
12:00 PM
Hari Srinivasan, Director of Product Management, Qualys
Hari Srinivasan, Director of Product Management, Qualys
Event Updates
50%
50%

Build Security into Container Deployment

Container adoption has skyrocketed, and with it the importance of securing the applications that DevOps teams create and deploy using this method of OS virtualization.

Container adoption has skyrocketed, and with it the importance of securing the applications that DevOps teams create and deploy using this method of OS virtualization.

The protection that security teams provide must be comprehensive across the container lifecycle, and built seamlessly and unobtrusively into the DevOps pipeline.

Accomplishing this requires understanding Docker container technology, and adopting processes and tools tailored for these environments.

Container security challenges

Containers qualities that developers find attractive, such as packaging an application and its dependencies without a guest OS, also create create security and compliance issues.

These challenges include developers’ use of software from public repositories, which often has vulnerabilities, and their deployment of weakly-configured containers.

In addition, containers communicate directly with each other via exposed network ports bypassing host controls, and their ephemeral nature makes them hard to track.

Protecting the container pipeline

All phases of container deployment have to be secured -- build, ship and runtime. Let’s look at them in detail.

Build

In this phase, the goal is blocking vulnerable images from your organization’s repositories, especially images pulled from a public repository.

To keep unsafe images out, you should leverage REST APIs or native plug-ins, so that security checks can automatically run within your DevOps team’s CI/CD tools.

These integrations will also let security teams give developers access to security tools. That way, developers can perform security functions from CI/CD tools without involving security teams.

Ship

In this phase, you should make sure that images in your repositories are checked for vulnerabilities. Registries and repositories should be inventoried. As images are added, scan them for vulnerabilities.

Also check that your organization’s images come from reputable sources that keep images current and scrubbed of vulnerabilities. Using notary services can help ensure only trusted images are used in your environment.

Runtime

With the container images now on your registry and available for production use, it’s critical to have visibility and continuous monitoring of runtime environments, as well as the ability to prevent and respond to breaches.

Security teams must detect rogue, vulnerable containers, identify where they are, and assess their potential impact based on how widespread they are in your environment.

A key here is to flag containers already running on the system that are breaking off from the “immutable” behavior of their parent image, which could indicate a breach.

After identifying rogue containers, your security tool should allow you to enforce counter measures of blocking or quarantining, and to drill down into anomalies’ details.

An even better option: Automatically validate the image against security policies using your tool, and block unapproved images from being spun up as containers. Here you can leverage orchestrators like Kubernetes to prevent rogue containers from entering the environment via admission controllers.

Summary

We hope this article has helped you better understand the particular security challenges of containers, and how to address them throughout their lifecycle.

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Edge-DRsplash-10-edge-articles
I Smell a RAT! New Cybersecurity Threats for the Crypto Industry
David Trepp, Partner, IT Assurance with accounting and advisory firm BPM LLP,  7/9/2021
News
Attacks on Kaseya Servers Led to Ransomware in Less Than 2 Hours
Robert Lemos, Contributing Writer,  7/7/2021
Commentary
It's in the Game (but It Shouldn't Be)
Tal Memran, Cybersecurity Expert, CYE,  7/9/2021
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon
Current Issue
The State of Cybersecurity Incident Response
In this report learn how enterprises are building their incident response teams and processes, how they research potential compromises, how they respond to new breaches, and what tools and processes they use to remediate problems and improve their cyber defenses for the future.
Flash Poll
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2021-37578
PUBLISHED: 2021-07-29
Apache jUDDI uses several classes related to Java's Remote Method Invocation (RMI) which (as an extension to UDDI) provides an alternate transport for accessing UDDI services. RMI uses the default Java serialization mechanism to pass parameters in RMI invocations. A remote attacker can send a malic...
CVE-2021-23416
PUBLISHED: 2021-07-28
This affects all versions of package curly-bracket-parser. When used as a template library, it does not properly sanitize the user input.
CVE-2021-23417
PUBLISHED: 2021-07-28
All versions of package deepmergefn are vulnerable to Prototype Pollution via deepMerge function.
CVE-2021-23415
PUBLISHED: 2021-07-28
This affects the package elFinder.AspNet before 1.1.1. The user-controlled file name is not properly sanitized before it is used to create a file system path.
CVE-2020-4974
PUBLISHED: 2021-07-28
IBM Jazz Foundation products are vulnerable to server side request forgery (SSRF). This may allow an authenticated attacker to send unauthorized requests from the system, potentially leading to network enumeration or facilitating other attacks. IBM X-Force ID: 192434.