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9/11/2019
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Stanford Launches Foundations of Information Security Course

Stanford Center for Professional Development is excited to anounce the launch of “Foundations of Information Security,” an online course, offered through the Stanford Center for Professional Development. The course was created by Neil Daswani, Co-director, Stanford Advanced Computer Security Certificate, and Professor Dan Boneh of the Stanford Department of Computer Science. The goal is to help interested professionals explore the field of modern cybersecurity and encourage more qualified individuals to work in this all-important field.

Data breaches, malware and cybercriminals continue to pose a serious threat to every industry and organization, creating a huge demand for trained information security specialists. Supply, however, does not meet demand, according to CyberSeek, which estimates approximately 300,000 cybersecurity positions currently go unfilled in the United States. Other reports suggest that within a few years, there will be millions of unfilled cybersecurity jobs. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts that over the next five years the security job market will increase 28%. That means that this is an incredible time for recent graduates as well as professionals in a variety of fields to get trained to fill this particular workforce gap.

Stanford’s new Foundations of Information Security course can help prepare learners obtain employment and succeed. The course will cover the basics of information security and explore how modern cybersecurity countermeasures work. 

The course is particularly engaging as it features the combination of:

  • Video interviews with luminaries in the field, including Vint Cerf (co-designer of TCP/IP and often referred to as a “Father of the Internet”), as well as other guests from top organizations.
  • Lessons covering the five most common root causes of data breaches and how to prevent, detect, contain, and recover from them. These modules explore some of the largest breaches in history and what cybersecurity professionals can learn from them. 
  • Key technical topics that can be applied to the day-to-day work of an information security specialist, including how command injections, buffer overflows and cross-domain attacks work. 
  • Lectures and supplemental learning materials that teach useful countermeasures to stop security threats in their tracks.
  • Guidance on how to build, organize and grow the information security program at your organization. 

If that’s not enough, learners can further build upon the foundations of this new course by enrolling in Stanford’s Advanced Computer Security Program (ACS), which teaches professionals about emerging threats and defenses, how to work with executive leadership to achieve security, or even aspire become a Chief Information Security Officer. Those who complete the ACS program are also provided access to an exclusive LinkedIn group, where jobs in the field will be shared and members can network with other certificate holders.

Given the current state of the cybersecurity landscape, developing a more robust pool of information security professionals is essential to help protect organizations from costly data breaches. Join me in exploring how our Foundations of Information Security course can help you and your organization can be a part of this exciting field.

Have questions or want to know more about this new course? Reach out to our Advanced Computer Security team.

 

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