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New Malware Puts Nasty Spin On Remote Control
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rsexton322
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rsexton322,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/22/2012 | 12:24:58 PM
re: New Malware Puts Nasty Spin On Remote Control
Well this just stinks! I am a network admin, and I take care of more than one network, which is more than one location and more than one company. I do this at night while most normal people are sleeping, and you can bet your behind I do this via remote control tools. I've not clicked the links in this article so I have only read this, but without question other than "monitoring" which you can rest assured I am on who does monitor and log everything so that part of my job which is very time consuming is done. I really need a sure fire way to ensure I am protected from this, and I do have current counter measures in place that if this article is correct, will provide protection against this attack, but I will not disclose publicly, but should someone else need this type of protection, I am for hire. :-)
I would think any company of any size with any number of online computers need and want remote access. Even a one man show will at times need access to data located at the office and unless they want to revert back to sneaker-net, remote access is needed. If you don't have remote access again, I am for hire. :-)
Rob
904-262-6046
HH000
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HH000,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/22/2012 | 6:06:03 AM
re: New Malware Puts Nasty Spin On Remote Control
Any kind of malware's can be get rid of using Comodo Antivirus.
Andrew Hornback
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Andrew Hornback,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/22/2012 | 12:29:49 AM
re: New Malware Puts Nasty Spin On Remote Control
At the root of all of this, this GeorBot seems to give an attacker a way of targeting specific users for their attack, rather than just picking random systems and going after full control of a system as opposed to shutting down or taking over specific services.

It's also somewhat amusing that the security research interviewed for this article is talking about ways of preventing this exploit at the end and how they are easier enumerated than accomplished. His recommendations are quite basic, quite simple and should be the first steps that anyone responsible for security on a network should take to assure the integrity of that network. Securing endpoints and making sure that they have all relevant patches is not hard with modern tools and is a requirement for a number of different legal compliance situations. But no matter what route you choose to secure systems, monitoring is an absolute must.

Andrew Hornback
InformationWeek Contributor


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