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CISPA Bill: 5 Main Privacy Worries
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Andrew Hornback
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Andrew Hornback,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/20/2012 | 2:37:52 AM
re: CISPA Bill: 5 Main Privacy Worries
On point 1 - every organization that I've been involved with has made it very clear that any information accessed or input on their systems is their property. Data that travels across their circuits (which were procured under the guise of empowering employees to do work) also becomes their property - whether they choose to examine it or not. Having built a sniffer system in the past for a previous employer, it is not only possible for them to examine that data, but also look at it in near real time. When you are using an employer's computing facilities to do personal tasks (e-mail, Facebook, eBay, etc.) you may be in violation of the terms of usage agreement that you may have signed prior to being granted access on the network. Point blank - don't use company resources for personal tasks.

On point 2 - who makes the determination as to what information should be passed along as being threat-related and who redacts that information to protect the civil liberties of the users? Then, who watches these watchers? Could turn into a downward logical spiral.

On point 3 - this really isn't a new item. Anyone, anywhere, at any time, can share any information they want with the National Security Agency. It's when the NSA or any of the other alphabet-soup organizations come looking for your information that the "rules of engagement" change.

On point 4 - it sounds to me like we either need to a) elect officials who actually know the difference between cybersecurity threats and fried green tomatoes or b) have the lobbyist groups draft the legislation and put it before a group of legislators that still don't know the difference between cybersecurity threats and fried green tomatoes. Passing legislation on things that you know little to nothing about is a recipe for disaster.

On point 5 - see point 4 and look for the fried green tomatoes. Passing legislation on things that you know little to nothing about is a recipe for disaster. I'm quite convinced that no piece of legislation in this arena is going to satisfy all parties and stakeholders. It's generally accepted that something needs to be done, but how it gets done is a point of contention that brings out the best in some people, even Anonymous, apparently.

Andrew Hornback
InformationWeek Contributor
Bprince
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Bprince,
User Rank: Ninja
4/18/2012 | 3:56:57 PM
re: CISPA Bill: 5 Main Privacy Worries
@readers - numbers 2 and 3 touch on the issue of information sharing, which some in the critical infrastructure companies and intelligence community say there isn't enough of, while critics here say it could be dangerous. How should the balance be struck here between the need to share information and the need to protect civil liberties?
Brian Prince, InformationWeek/Dark Reading Comment Moderator


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