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Teaming Up to Educate and Enable Better Defense Against Phishing
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RyanSepe
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RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
5/14/2015 | 8:44:08 AM
Re: 1,500 Phish a Month
Ah ok, thanks for clarifying. I would imagine pulling sites is based on a "level of integrity" basis. This makes much more sense, thanks again for elaborating.
RetiredUser
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RetiredUser,
User Rank: Ninja
5/14/2015 | 8:39:37 AM
Re: 1,500 Phish a Month
I don't mean to call out a single site, but I happen to like OpenDNS who developed PhishTank.  I think the value in DBs like this is based upon the fact that data does rapidly change for phishing sites.  With a model like PhishTank where you can develop your own anti-phishing apps against an OpenDNS API, you can actually rapidly log and pull sites, cross-reference and protect with fairly high accuracy.  Nothing's perfect, of course.  Like any spam filter your phishing filter will have flaws, but as the DB, the data and the apps developed to use them mature, their usefulness will become much more clear. 
RyanSepe
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RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
5/14/2015 | 8:17:43 AM
Re: 1,500 Phish a Month
I'm interested in this statement, "I like projects like PhishTank where you can report suspected phishermen and slowly build a database of confirmed malicious emailers."


Could you elaborate more to the value this provides? It's very easy to change email addresses so I don't see how the database would be overly effective. The source could easily pivot and keep on going with the recipient database they have. Thanks,
RetiredUser
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RetiredUser,
User Rank: Ninja
5/14/2015 | 2:41:02 AM
1,500 Phish a Month
Between all my email accounts, I've estimated that I get roughly 1,500 phish a month.  Mind you, this isn't junk mail - these are emails that contain verbiage and links designed to extract information, to get me to login to a site with a pretense that ideally will convince me to use credentials tied to my finances, etc.  

My way of dealing with this is simple.  I've built a dictionary that is a compilation of keywords and phrases culled from this monthly mountain of madness.  Line up with any number of individual keywords or phrases, and my filters are permanently deleting you, after logging a tick for your status as "another one of those..."

Of course, this is not what I want to do.  I'd rather respond back in kind, perhaps with a bit more venom in the response, and crush them at their own game.  Phish for my banking credentials, get hit with a virus in return.  Of course, the problem is even the most talented of InfoSec pros have a hard time tracing phish back to their home schools...

I like projects like PhishTank where you can report suspected phishermen and slowly build a database of confirmed malicious emailers.  It's not as glamorous as dropping the phisherman by sending back a shark, but it does a public service in pulling together victims of common crimes to aid others avoid being hit.

In time, these databases will be valuable and just having access to them could eventually come at a price.  Jump on them now while most are still free.


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