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Better Locks Than Back Doors: Why Apple Is Right About Encryption
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CoreyN293
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CoreyN293,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/7/2016 | 8:02:51 PM
Re: John McAfee
BTW.. an update to my response that I thought McAfee's claims about hacking the iPhone 5c was all bluster... Turns out I was on to something... Anew article just came out where he said he lied about it to get more attention on the issue... I can't share the direct link, but you can find it on The Daily Dot, titled: 

John McAfee lied about San Bernardino shooter's iPhone hack to 'get a s**tload of public attention'

 


 

 
CoreyN293
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CoreyN293,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/4/2016 | 5:28:30 PM
Re: John McAfee
I think it's all bluster... As another security expert already said, if McAfee really had someone that could crack the iPhone 5c, he'd actually use a real 5c and do a video proof-of-concept (PoC) on that phone to prove it. In other words, pics, or in this case, video or it didn't happen...

 

That said, sure it's theoretically possible that there is an vulnerability somewhere in iOS that a researcher finds one day, but until McAfee shows a PoC, I assume its all talk...
CoreyN293
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CoreyN293,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/4/2016 | 5:24:24 PM
Re: Ends Don't Justify the Means
I actually think intelligence gathering attempts are proper in this case.

I honestly don't care about the privacy of a dead terrorist and murder... So I don't think there is anything wrong with the FBI having all the terrorist's stuff and trying to break into this phone... However, I do think asking an external third party to specifically break a security control and have to take the undue burdern of designing a special operating systems for this one case is too much...

I do care about the privacy of Apple's millions of other customers. So while the FBI does keep insisting this special firmware will only be for this one phone, I think this would set a precident for many others, which may not be as clear cut as this one terrorist case... Plus, it doesn't even discuss how much burden a private company needs to go under to support the authorities... If they do decrypt this one phone, and then authorities come to Apple with hundreds of other phone, next thing you know Apple is spending all time and money on something that is really not their business.. So besides just that fact that the existence of this technique makes everyone's phones less safe, we need to also consider the burden on a private business that had nothing to do with the attack.
RyanSepe
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RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
3/2/2016 | 8:20:15 AM
Ends Don't Justify the Means
I agree with you that in this case that the ends do not justify the means because they jeopardize the privacy of so many others. But when is intelligence gathering the proper course of action. The phone in question could harbor data that may lead to potential saving of lives, etc.
RyanSepe
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50%
RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
3/2/2016 | 8:13:30 AM
John McAfee
Is there truth in that John McAfee interview around the ability of cracking into an iPhone. Logically what he is saying makes sense but I think he is over simplifying the process of cracking into the phone.


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