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The Case For A Cyber Arms Treaty
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Andrew Hornback
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Andrew Hornback,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/28/2012 | 2:03:26 AM
re: The Case For A Cyber Arms Treaty
By developing the most advanced weapons in the world, one can develop the most advanced defenses in the world - I think that's a pretty fair statement.

All throughout history, there have been things going on that the average Joe or Jane on the street don't know about but should be thankful for - things that their country is doing to protect them, whether they approve or disapprove of it.

Kaspersky's a funny guy here - sure, go ahead, ban malware. Doesn't that put him out of business? And as other posters have mentioned, sure, you can have every country on the face of the planet sign a treaty saying that they won't develop or use malware - but that doesn't keep a 14 year old kid from sitting down and learning assembly, C, or any other language and building something that could obliterate a network. No, a treaty, while nice on paper... exists only on paper.

Having malware banned leads to a false sense of security - sure, let's ban it... and forget how to defend against it. Then when the next attack happens, it's magnitudes worse. And the next attack will happen, it's just a matter of when. You have to be ready for it... and a treaty is not going to do much to help prevent an attack or clean up after one.

Andrew Hornback
InformationWeek Contributor
MyW0r1d
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MyW0r1d,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/27/2012 | 3:10:46 PM
re: The Case For A Cyber Arms Treaty
Article states, "Having been the first nation to use it purposefully against the weapons program of another state--to have 'crossed the Rubicon,' as General Michael Hayden, the former Bush intelligence chief, put it--will we eventually be judged to have hastened its spread?"

Has that ever stopped the US Govt or any nation of developing and using a system to its advantage either strategically or operationally? They used firearms against native americans and were the first to use/introduce nuclear weapons. An unknown or unproven weapon system serves little as a detterrent. Treaties are nice, but as others have stated, wholly reliable on the good faith of the parties. As with regulatory guidance and laws, sometimes the value gained may just be worth the penalty imposed for non adherence.
moarsauce123
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moarsauce123,
User Rank: Ninja
8/26/2012 | 1:20:36 PM
re: The Case For A Cyber Arms Treaty
Treaties are only worth something when the partners adhere to them. Just look at the reports about human rights violations and you will see that a treaty for cyber security between US and China is just a waster of paper and resources.
Leo Regulus
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Leo Regulus,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/25/2012 | 5:45:18 PM
re: The Case For A Cyber Arms Treaty
GET THIS TO YOUR EDITOR:
You have made some client-unfriendly changes.
When we hit the 'Print' Icon, we expect to see the entire article as one page and relatively 'free' of garbage.
On this article, it was necessary to go to page 2 to get the whole article.
The result was also littered with garbage.
I will not insult your intelligence by specifically what I define as 'garbage'.
TreeInMyCube
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50%
TreeInMyCube,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/24/2012 | 6:11:30 PM
re: The Case For A Cyber Arms Treaty
A treaty is a nice idea, but ineffective, since there are too many non-nation-state actors. Building nuclear weapons requires fissile material, which is not sold in every Best Buy or Walmart. Building malware can be done on a laptop, and launched from an Internet cafe.
Perhaps the only effective defense for the US military is to build out private networks that are not visible to other parties, friends or foes.


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