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GoDaddy Outage: Anonymous Attack Or IT Failure?
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phpguy1
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phpguy1,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/15/2012 | 3:34:32 PM
re: GoDaddy Outage: Anonymous Attack Or IT Failure?
The noted SQL injection attach is incorrect. The supplied screen shot image is cross-site-scripting (XSS) which in most cases only affects the user performing the XSS (e.g. session stealing/logging). Have a look at the address bar in the screen shot. The screen shot alone screams script-kiddie not black hatter. Anybody can scan a website for SQL or XSS with free software. Taking down routers in a protected network would require real skill.
Andrew Hornback
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Andrew Hornback,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/13/2012 | 3:21:27 AM
re: GoDaddy Outage: Anonymous Attack Or IT Failure?
So, basically, what GoDaddy is saying at this point is that a failure in their change management system led to a systemic failure of their entire infrastructure. Don't they test things before they put them into a production environment?

Now, since GoDaddy themselves are not a publicly traded company, they don't specifically have to deal with regulations like Sarbanes-Oxley... but the group of investment firms that holds a majority stake in GoDaddy includes KKR Capstone (a publicly traded company).

Maybe it's the conspiracy theorist in me, but is it possible that this was an inside job? Think about it for a minute - you've built out an infrastructure that runs with 5 9s of reliability and has been running that way for a while (prior to this event, when was the last time you heard of a MAJOR outage at GoDaddy?) and suddenly, a corrupted router table takes your entire infrastructure out for 6 hours.

You suffer a major outage that directly affects small and medium sized businesses (those that can least handle instability, especially if they are using their site as a direct e-commerce site that engages customers as well as their ordering/logistics systems). Those customers go elsewhere to "more safe and secure" facilities for domain registration, DNS and hosting. You begin to lose revenue. Your organization begins to lose value.

Meanwhile, roughly 14 months ago, 65% of your organization was purchased by three investment firms for 2.25B USD. So, the value of the firm drops just far enough for those three venture capital firms to offer to buy out the rest of the organization (this would be the next shoe to drop, as it were).

You have an organization that's been doing well - winning awards - but also enjoying a lot of bad press (but since when is bad press really all that bad these days?) and an organization that is in a bit of upheaval since your last CEO spent 12 months at the top and decided to bail out - and the previous CEO is still around in the executive committee.

I'm thinking that maybe this was a way of someone to manipulate the worth of the organization in a way that another organization can purchase a majority stake, "clean house" and move more into the cloud computing arena - GoDaddy has already been taking steps in doing just that, but the opportunity to revamp and distance itself from its own history may end up being good for business in the long run as compared to this "blip on the radar" in the short term.

As far as the whole Anonymous tie-in, that has to do with being at the right place, at the right time, and using social media to make claims that they can't back up. After all, everything you read on Twitter is legitimate, right?

Granted, I could be quite wrong here... but what if I'm not? At any rate, get your popcorn ready - the main feature is about to begin...

Andrew Hornback
InformationWeek Contributor
Tom LaSusa
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Tom LaSusa,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/12/2012 | 8:39:23 PM
re: GoDaddy Outage: Anonymous Attack Or IT Failure?
Hey there Gabe,

Nice outreach there!

Best
Tom LaSusa
InformationWeek Community Manager
hwertz
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hwertz,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/12/2012 | 5:14:42 PM
re: GoDaddy Outage: Anonymous Attack Or IT Failure?
Good thing it's on a credit card (it is, hopefully, as opposed to being a debit card...). You can stop payment, and even if the charge has processed the charge can be reversed.
Gabe_GoDaddy
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Gabe_GoDaddy,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/12/2012 | 5:09:25 PM
re: GoDaddy Outage: Anonymous Attack Or IT Failure?
Hi MLNESC,

I am very sorry to hear about this frustrating experience. Although I am not comprised of the details of your specific situation, I would like to invite you to give our billing team a call so that we can work with you t get this resolved.

480-505-8855
MLNESC
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MLNESC,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/12/2012 | 4:34:46 PM
re: GoDaddy Outage: Anonymous Attack Or IT Failure?
Here is a comment from a real customer...me!
I am a godaddy customer and 2 days before they went down, my unused VPS (server) was hit with a huge spike of traffic (from 200meg normal bandwith to 6 terabytes in 1day) I called the morning, coincidenally, the day that Godaddy crashed, and tech support told me i was hacked by someone sending massive traffic to the server and to take certain steps to fix it, which i could not because then godaddy went down. Today, i got a $6250 charge on my credit card for overage and cannot get anyone in their tech support to acknowledge the anomoly of the huge spike or the timing of this issue. like talking to wall, they just keep saying "check your logs". so for me, their offer for one month free is not going to touch the $6250 charge for an unused server that i pay $50/month for....and..sort of a strange coincidence, right?
shane1274
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50%
shane1274,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/12/2012 | 3:42:20 PM
re: GoDaddy Outage: Anonymous Attack Or IT Failure?
I was at the godaddy website registering a domain name, there was an alert on the website explaining that there would be some connection issues,,,,they even posted what times there may be issues. So if they knew when there would be issues I doubt that it was a hacker,,,unless he was nice enough to notify them of when he was going to hack them.


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