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To Narrow the Cyber Skills Gap with Attackers, Cut the Red Tape
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RetiredUser
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RetiredUser,
User Rank: Ninja
5/22/2019 | 3:17:32 AM
The Offensive Security Model
This is one of the most re-hashed complaints in tech and for a reason.  Since the Nineties I've been working in tech and always sought out work where part of the interview process put me in front of a terminal.  Even the certifications I've obtained I leave off my resume because getting a job based off certs my last company footed the bill for means I didn't prove myself to the new employer.  Give the candidate a pile of parts and have them build a PC/server/laptop, install an OS, configure a network; break into the network.  Don't tell me what you've done, show me what you can do.

For InfoSec, just as in respected certs for Linux, the model must include partial book work and paper tests, but the majority has to be hands-on execution, proof of knowledge, or no cert.  Companies who want to obtain quality employees and keep them will adopt a similar model, including some of the recommendations in this article.  Implement an intensive hands-on interview process, "show me".  Implement a regular boot-camp with capture the flag (CTF) events to keep employees sharp; encourage gamification.

It's amazing how quickly the weak links are identified when your models become interactive - combative - and stop being passive.  If you're serious about your security and the integrity of your network, background checks and onsite hands-on proof of skill should be priority one, paper an afterthought.   
REISEN1955
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REISEN1955,
User Rank: Ninja
5/21/2019 | 3:43:39 PM
Certifications
They are paper proving you passed a test.  In a sense, great but mostly not so much.  Experience in the field counts and that goes for ANY subject in ANY field.  Not all IT staff have the budget for a CIISP certification and similiar ones.  True that is the gold standard but not many exist and the skill gap needs to be filled.  i would encourage filling the gap and providing resources for knowing candidates to GET a degee relatively quickly and efficiently.  BTW - when I was a self-employed consultant some 5 years ago, knew nothing about malware and practical measures on backup saved a 501C3 museum from Cryptolocker.  I was doing it RIGHT WITHOUT KNOWING IT.  Restoration 98% within 3 hours.  Not bad.  So experience counts.  Read that Baltimore?  

Full disclosure - on September 11 my data center crashed 103 floors in the south tower and I got out of 101 of them by walking.  Relatively familiar by default with disaster recovery and business continuity planning. 


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