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Don't Blame China For Security Hacks, Blame Yourself
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JasonRemillard
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JasonRemillard,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/15/2013 | 11:23:25 AM
re: Don't Blame China For Security Hacks, Blame Yourself
For all of the perimeter protection activities everyone is working so hard on - the sad fact is that security still is like a Smartie - hard on the outside, soft and mushy on the inside.

There has been more focus of late on internal security work - but we're finding there is a long way to go. Its not just about having 2FA or more crypto on VPN tunnels - its about building more context for the persona of the identity - knowing more and more about it to enable better decisioning via automated systems.

For example, if you have layers 1-3 managed via 'Identity Aware' systems, and upper layers (OS/apps) also understanding Identity, they can make better decisions about whether to allow this login from an internal service account that was just reset 14 seconds ago in another data center, that hasn't been reset in 5 years and is an un-owned ID.

We are working hard on delivering that vision - where all systems involved in the operation have more information about context and persona - since we all believe in Security in Depth, in my opinion the 'depth' comes from having more understanding of the context and stance of that permission/access/group, etc. Its not just jamming attributes to a user - its about bringing it all together to support a cohesive and heterogeneous infrastructure.

Jason Remillard
Product Manager, Dell Quest Software
LawrenceGarvin
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LawrenceGarvin,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/2/2013 | 2:09:03 PM
re: Don't Blame China For Security Hacks, Blame Yourself
While I don't disagree that organizations need to pay more attention to their own information security requirements .... diverting blame from the Chinese (or whoever) for their *actions* is tantamount to not prosecuting a home invader because I didn't have a crash bar installed on my front door.

We certainly need to engage in preemptive protections because there are "bad guys" in the world, but the "bad guys" need to be held accountable for their actions ... always!
TreeInMyCube
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TreeInMyCube,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/27/2013 | 6:48:59 PM
re: Don't Blame China For Security Hacks, Blame Yourself
As an IT professonal, I am worried that my peers may not be protecting their assets properly, may not be adequately documenting their work, and may be opening themselves up for theft or data loss. I'm also aware that there are individuals and groups who engage in criminal behavior online, just as there are pickpockets, muggers, and murderers in real cities. To some extent, I worry about my own physical and digital security. Your comment abou the roles of NOCs is pertinent.
However, I choose to think that nation-states, which are signatories to treaties including the UN charter and are subject to declarations of war, should be held to a different standard than random individual criminals. I am not happy that {insert country names here} are engaging in active,offensive cyber attacks on companies. If a group of Chinese army soldiers entered the NY Times facilities, broke equipment, and stole confidential documents, this would constitute a real and substantial breach of international relations. Why should I take a different view if the incursion, damage and theft occured digitally? Because the law and rules have not caught up with technology?
Ian Bruce
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Ian Bruce,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/27/2013 | 4:26:51 PM
re: Don't Blame China For Security Hacks, Blame Yourself
While I think it's a little tough to blame the victim for the crime, I get the point you're making. If you don't lock the door, you might expect theives.

Truth is, most data breaches aren't a result of hacking and malicious activity - they're a result of us all making dumb mistakes. Forrester estimates over 60% of breaches are a result of accidents - sending files to the wrong distribution list, synching a file on unsecure cloud services, or leaving that thumb drive on the train. For an interesting perspective see http://blogs.computerworld.com...

Ian Bruce/Intralinks.
Andrew Hornback
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Andrew Hornback,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/27/2013 | 2:35:50 AM
re: Don't Blame China For Security Hacks, Blame Yourself
Don't be worried that the Chinese Army is actively engaging in cyber espionage. Worry that the rest of the world is doing the same without a whole lot of commotion being made over their attempts.

And consider that anyone with a computer can either be actively or passively (as part of a botnet) engaging in cyber espionage. Now, you too can truly be an "army of one" and attack any civilian or military target you want from the comfort and safety of your own home. Just as any other person connected to the Internet can do the same.

Worry that the folks operating the NOCs for the ISPs and other providers aren't recognizing and stopping these acts while they're in the core, before they get to the endpoint or the destination. Worry that enterprises exist where only one person has control of all of the security related information, and it's all in their head.

Stopping "piracy" on the "high nets"... that's a good one. Remove the need to accumulate wealth from human nature and I think you'll have a good start. Best way to do that would be to make sure that all basic human needs are met for each human on the face of the planet... but that gets in an entirely different discussion.

Andrew Hornback
InformationWeek Contributor
FFoxx
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FFoxx,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/26/2013 | 7:05:05 PM
re: Don't Blame China For Security Hacks, Blame Yourself
Mr Schwartz, you don't know what you don't know about Chinese attacks.
TreeInMyCube
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TreeInMyCube,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/25/2013 | 9:37:12 PM
re: Don't Blame China For Security Hacks, Blame Yourself
From an IT security point-of-view, I can agree that private companies are responsible for implementing common sense fixes. From a citizen's point of view, I am very worried that the army of the country with the world's second largest economy is actively engaging in cyber espionage. The fact that other nation-states do this also is not comforting, either. This is real money we're talking about here. We sent gunboats to stop Somali pirates who were stealing real money. What are the alternatives for convincing nation-states to stop piracy on the "high nets"?
Drew Conry-Murray
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Drew Conry-Murray,
User Rank: Ninja
2/25/2013 | 8:53:17 PM
re: Don't Blame China For Security Hacks, Blame Yourself
On one hand it's encouraging that some relatively simple steps can be taken to reduce security risks. On the other hand, it's frustrating that many of these steps have been available to us for years and years and years, and yet the security community still has to repeat this message over and over.

Drew Conry-Murray
Editor, Network Computing
lgarey@techweb.com
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[email protected],
User Rank: Apprentice
2/25/2013 | 6:36:27 PM
re: Don't Blame China For Security Hacks, Blame Yourself
War, whether cyber or physical, is big business. Sold the pentagon all the stealth bombers it needs? Gin up outrage against China to sell the latest infosec defensive mechanism. Sadly, there's not much profit in common sense (read: whitelisting and limiting admin access). Lorna Garey, IW Reports.


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