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What Prism Knows: 8 Metadata Facts
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Andrew Hornback
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Andrew Hornback,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/26/2013 | 3:05:36 AM
re: What Prism Knows: 8 Metadata Facts
The major problem with Mr. Lewis' point is that if we had a benevolent government that we could trust, this would be an entirely different kettle of fish. Problem is, in 2013, there's a serious divide in the American political spectrum and programs like these can be abused for political gains. One needs only look at the fallout surrounding the IRS scandal to rest assured of that and the point hat Marlinspike brings up not only echoes that but amplifies it.

People need to remember that there is an entire cottage industry out there based solely on the collection and aggregation of your personal data and the resale of that data to organizations for any use they deem fit - whether it be advertising (a benign use) or something more sinister.

The really major issue that I have with these programs is that public knowledge of these collection efforts leads to interest from organizations that don't have the best interests of the American people at heart.

Imagine what happens if a group like Anonymous or an enemy power gains access to all of your personal data. Would you ever feel safe again? And given that the number of attacks is escalating on a year over year basis as well... it's just a matter of time. Identity theft may well be the tip of the iceberg...

Andrew Hornback
InformationWeek Contributor
Truthsmith
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Truthsmith,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/21/2013 | 5:24:36 PM
re: What Prism Knows: 8 Metadata Facts
The argument by Lewis: if it safeguards people's political liberties, then
capturing metadata is a useful technique. "The essential political
rights are freedom of expression and assembly, freedom from arbitrary
detention, and the right to petition the government for a redress of
grievances," Lewis said. "If these four rights are protected, surveillance is immaterial in its effect on civil liberties.

He points to four essential "political liberties" as if they are the ones that count, as if they are the only ones that count. Note that he left out another very important one, the one that is DIRECTLY violated by the NSA practices:

Amendment 4: "The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized."

The NSA's massive metadata collection is absolutely UNREASONABLE SEARCH. We all know that. Blabbing on about these other four "rights" reminds me of the rich young ruler that obeyed four commandments, but he failed on the biggest one, because he loved his riches more than God.
MikeSMJ
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MikeSMJ,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/19/2013 | 9:22:40 PM
re: What Prism Knows: 8 Metadata Facts
As Bruce Schneier pointed out, the metadata can be more important, and more useful in investigations, than the data. In fact, with "Big Data" research techniques, the metadata can be used to find "key individuals" and clusters of individuals for any community of interest.

That is, the same techniques that are used to identify "potential" terrorists can be used to identify gun control activists, or women's rights activists, or (let's keep this balanced) "states rights" activists.

Once any organization - particularly a government - has this kind of power available, it becomes next to impossible to prevent its use for other purposes than the original intent. There is nothing to prevent the government from deciding that these interest groups are somehow a "danger to the society", and restricting their "freedom of expression and assembly, freedom from
arbitrary detention, and the right to petition the government for a
redress of grievances." Under the circumstances, I believe that
James A. Lewis is being naive to assert that this kind of invasion of privacy is not dangerous.


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