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Why IT Security RFPs Are Like Junk Food
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Eloisetacos
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Eloisetacos,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/13/2020 | 5:38:52 AM
Re: Where's the beef in your vendor security RFPs?

This article is still relevant several years later ... with the health crisis what you say makes a lot of sense today! Thanks a lot. 
Marilyn Cohodas
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Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
1/22/2014 | 9:35:48 AM
Re: *sigh*
@stratustician What are some of the most egregious items that you've seen in RFPs and if it was up to you, how would you overhaul the process to make it  credible?
Stratustician
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Stratustician,
User Rank: Moderator
1/20/2014 | 2:05:54 PM
*sigh*
I personally like to think of RFP to stand for "Request for Punishment" since honestly, especially when it comes to security, it's really a crapshoot.  For one, as pointed out, half the time the request is a laundry list of things they'd love to see, but really unless you have the right people writing these things, half of them are really not going to solve the problem that they are really trying to solve.  It's a "tell me what you have to fix this problem, but we're not going to tell you what the problem is".  Often they are looking for solutions that they've heard are the latest and greatest and will solve all their woes, but even if the right product is positioned (Huzzah!), cost is often such a critical component that it doesn't matter anyway.  Not to mention that half these RFPs are written in conjunction with a vendor who can conviently bid on it.  It's such as strange process, that really, needs to be overhauled.
Marilyn Cohodas
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Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
1/13/2014 | 5:15:30 PM
Where's the beef in your vendor security RFPs?
Are you getting the most out of your security vendors from the request for proposal process? Let's chat about your greatest successes -- and worst failures. 

 

 


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