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Security Minor Leagues
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ODA155
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ODA155,
User Rank: Ninja
5/17/2013 | 6:24:22 PM
re: Security Minor Leagues
"For instance, so one who is really good in doing research and has a
background preferably in Linux would be my first pick. Why? Most
firewalls, IPSGs and SPAM engines for instance usually run on some form
of Linux, if not some sort of proprietary OS or firmware under the
covers."

I Totally disagree with that, because, it leads me to believe that you have a Linux background and supposedly only people with Linux backgrounds can do anything, however Linux is NOT the end-all-be-all. I think that the best security personnel do come from the network\sysadmin (Linux, Novell or Microsoft) professions, the problem is getting them to stop thinking like an admin and look at the picture from the point of view of "...is it secure secure or not..." versus "...why isn't it secure or not...", and teach them how to understand the need for policy and why it's important to security, because in almost every case we know why something is not secure, (and network\sysadmins seem to take policy very personal). Also, these converts need to get tougher skin, and understand that when you're the bearer of not so good news nobody ever likes you.
ODA155
50%
50%
ODA155,
User Rank: Ninja
5/17/2013 | 2:16:17 PM
re: Security Minor Leagues
"Can't find people..." OMG, what a joke! Just another excuse to import someone who's cheaper. First I would suggest writing a job description that ACTUALLY defines what the position is and THEN list those (sexy) secondary and tertiary skills and stop trying to find one person who knows EVERYTHING, because you're not going to find that person and even if you do, you will not be able to afford them or the position is so low level that these folks are looking for a job on Monster or CareerBuilder anyway, learn how to evaluate talent and stop being sold on the next guy send over by some head-hunter agency.

Hiring managers need to stop being petty, some are afraid to hire a person with more knowledge and skill than they themselves might have, and lets face it, a lot of managers and HR departments do not know how to evaluate these people or their backgrounds, in most cases all they're looking at are how many certs does a person have, or they're "looking for someone to hit the ground running"... yeah, that was in my job description when I was a paratrooper and chances are that "ideal" guy or gal that you want for your organization already has a very nice job so you'll just need to find your pin in the stack of other available pins.
mbstone
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mbstone,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/7/2013 | 2:24:46 PM
re: Security Minor Leagues
Every day I get offered another Candidate-Financed Relocation job and yes, usually it is located in the MFN. Like I really have this big bag of cash next to my desk labeled. Self-Relocation Money." I don't understand why recruiters and hiring managers think I can afford 2,000 miles of truck rental, security and first month's rent in Hootervile. And are there really candidates who are that stupid?
jim.kaufmann@imglobal.com
50%
50%
[email protected],
User Rank: Apprentice
5/6/2013 | 4:14:02 PM
re: Security Minor Leagues
I think this is a great post. However, Information Security takes some highly GǣspecializedGǥ types of people with a great need and wants to move into the hierarchies of Information Security. This is not a slam on the systems or network
administrators, but most have been GǣconditionedGǥ into to get the systems up and
operational as fast as they can with no regard to Security and what that
entails to any length or degree. I have 15 years of solid InfoSec experience and another 10 years in systems/network administration going back to the days of DOS 3.x. You need to know how the old threats have evolved over time into the threats we deal with today. Next, you need to think like a digital native and not a digital immigrant, this is step one.

For instance, so one who is really good in doing research and has a background preferably in Linux would be my first pick. Why? Most firewalls, IPSGs and SPAM engines for instance usually run on some form of Linux, if not some sort of proprietary OS or firmware under the covers.

While, I agree any one person could be a good candidate, some will be better than others. Next, this person is not afraid to read different types of (1000 pages or more) different Information Security technologies/books and studies the 10 domains of Information Security, from end to end. If youGre new to TCP/IP, Networking and how websites and ecommerce work youGre probably not ready for a career in
Information Security.

And finally, find a great mentor or mentors; mine were Marcus Ranum (Godfather of the Proxy Application Firewall) and Dr. Peter Tippett (Co-Inventor of Vaccine one of the first versions of AV, later Norton) who I worked with at TruSecure some years back, assisting with migrating InfoSec technologies from a company called Vigilinx. If you made it into Information Security welcome to the MAJORS, not the minors! All people have a vision to do great things all IGm saying is walk the walk, before you try and talk the talk. I was very fortunate, because I worked really hard at it.

I wish you success in all that you try!

Cheers,

Slim Jim


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