Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Risk

4/3/2012
06:46 PM
Thomas Claburn
Thomas Claburn
Commentary
Connect Directly
Google+
LinkedIn
Twitter
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

Girls Around Me App: Not Today's Creepiest Stalker

Was the Girls Around Me app tasteless and juvenile? Of course. But we should be far more concerned about being stalked by law enforcement agencies and our cell phone companies.

10 Top iOS 5 Apps
10 Top iOS 5 Apps
(click image for larger view and for slideshow)
Over the weekend, Russian app developer i-Free withdrew its Girls Around Me app, which last week faced a chorus of criticism on various websites for being a stalking tool. It allowed a user to map the location of nearby women and glean information about them, using public Facebook and Foursquare data.

The company said it removed its app from the iTunes App Store because Foursquare, swayed by the controversy, disallowed the app's access to its geolocation API, thereby preventing the app from working properly. The app had been downloaded over 70,000 times.

I-Free defended itself in a statement provided to the Wall Street Journal. "Girls Around Me does not provide any data that is unavailable to the user when he uses his or her social network account, nor does it reveal any data that users did not share with others," the company said.

Girls Around Me might have been tasteless, juvenile, and cynical, but in that it has plenty of company. App stores are full of crassly conceived software. What it's not is creepy, a term used by Cult of Mac to describe the app.

Creepy implies intent. It would be creepy if i-Free designed its app to be used for stalking and harassment. But there isn't any evidence of that intent. Nor is there any evidence that the app has been involved in an actual case of harm.

Certainly, Girls Around Me could be used for stalking, but the same can be said of binoculars. Binoculars are a tool that might be creepy in certain people's hands. But mainly, they're just a tool with legitimate uses.

[ Read 8 Tablets Fit For Windows 8 Beta. ]

Girls Around Me also is a tool, one that aggregates and correlates public data. Its primary crime appears to have been violating Foursquare's rules on aggregating API data from multiple locations. Most Internet users have probably committed a similar website rules violation at one time or another. Just as consumers gloss over privacy policies, i-Free's developers probably didn't read Foursquare's rules very closely.

Where does all this data come from? It's made available by users of Facebook and Foursquare. The thing that's really creepy about Girls Around Me is that it reveals people's proclivity for self-harm. Internet users had privacy before they started using social networks. Now they freak out when they see what can be done with the data they have so blithely shared.

The irony of this particular controversy is that it comes amid a far creepier revelation: According to documents obtained by the ACLU, law enforcement agencies routinely track people using cell phone data, often without warrants and with the cooperation of telecommunications companies--which generate revenue from customer data by charging service fees to law enforcement. You supply the data; your phone company gets paid.

Unlike aggregating public social network data, government scrutiny of cell phone data is a potential violation of constitutionally protected rights: The limited privacy rights enshrined in the U.S. Bill of Rights concern beliefs, home privacy, protection from government searches and seizures, and protection against self-incrimination. The protection against self-incrimination might as well be scrapped if participation in modern society entails unavoidable self-surveillance.

If you want creepy, consider this passage from a collection of documents compiled to help law enforcement personnel obtain cell phone data. It was posted by privacy researcher Christopher Soghoian. Though it is unattributed, the passage also appears in a 2006 newsletter posted in April 2011, where it's credited to California Deputy Attorney General Robert Morgester.

"Cellular phones have become the virtual biographer of our daily activities," Morgester wrote. "It [sic] tracks who we talk to and where we are. It will log calls, take pictures, and keep our contact list close at hand. In short it has become an indispensable piece of evidence in a criminal investigation."

The question we should be asking is not whether Girls Around Me encourages stalking. It's whether we as users of technology can have privacy if we choose it. Or is the unwritten rule of a mobile service contract that we shall submit a full account of our activities to be documented by our virtual biographer?

 

Recommended Reading:

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
holyfire001202
50%
50%
holyfire001202,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/7/2012 | 12:51:33 PM
re: Girls Around Me App: Not Today's Creepiest Stalker
YMOM, You're missing a piece. You stated the intent in that sentence. "...checking out a girl at a bar". His intent is to do whatever he's thinking about doing to-or for- this girl at the bar. The fact that we don't know what he's thinking makes him creepy. Now, If we saw a guy with skin problems and greasy hair missing an eye sitting at a bar having a laugh with another guy sitting next to him, he wouldn't be creepy, huh? Because all of a sudden his intent is having a good time with his friend, rather than [whatever he wanted to do] with that girl.
YMOM100
50%
50%
YMOM100,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/7/2012 | 7:27:47 PM
re: Girls Around Me App: Not Today's Creepiest Stalker
Wait, what? Since when does creepy imply intent? A guy with skin problems and greasy hair, missing an eye, checking out a girl at a bar may well be perceived as creepy whether he intended to or not. This app is creepy whether the devs intended it to be or not. You may want to consider supporting your premises with evidence in the future, as you may find holes in your logic before they get published!
kupjones
50%
50%
kupjones,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/6/2012 | 2:07:28 PM
re: Girls Around Me App: Not Today's Creepiest Stalker
My fear is you have this completely wrong - at least with law enforcement (in this country) we have some chance of eventually uncovering government abuse - and there are private orgs established to track this abuse. The Black Helicopters are there -- but at least we know they are there.

Contrast that against millions of free-agent abusers -- the thought is staggering. We've taken our eye off the real ball -- the fact that we are posting our lives onto a medium that is inherently not private, there for the millions to see. If this doesnt scare you, nothing will.
COVID-19: Latest Security News & Commentary
Dark Reading Staff 7/9/2020
4 Security Tips as the July 15 Tax-Day Extension Draws Near
Shane Buckley, President & Chief Operating Officer, Gigamon,  7/10/2020
Russian Cyber Gang 'Cosmic Lynx' Focuses on Email Fraud
Kelly Sheridan, Staff Editor, Dark Reading,  7/7/2020
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon
Current Issue
Special Report: Computing's New Normal, a Dark Reading Perspective
This special report examines how IT security organizations have adapted to the "new normal" of computing and what the long-term effects will be. Read it and get a unique set of perspectives on issues ranging from new threats & vulnerabilities as a result of remote working to how enterprise security strategy will be affected long term.
Flash Poll
The Threat from the Internetand What Your Organization Can Do About It
The Threat from the Internetand What Your Organization Can Do About It
This report describes some of the latest attacks and threats emanating from the Internet, as well as advice and tips on how your organization can mitigate those threats before they affect your business. Download it today!
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2020-15105
PUBLISHED: 2020-07-10
Django Two-Factor Authentication before 1.12, stores the user's password in clear text in the user session (base64-encoded). The password is stored in the session when the user submits their username and password, and is removed once they complete authentication by entering a two-factor authenticati...
CVE-2020-11061
PUBLISHED: 2020-07-10
In Bareos Director less than or equal to 16.2.10, 17.2.9, 18.2.8, and 19.2.7, a heap overflow allows a malicious client to corrupt the director's memory via oversized digest strings sent during initialization of a verify job. Disabling verify jobs mitigates the problem. This issue is also patched in...
CVE-2020-4042
PUBLISHED: 2020-07-10
Bareos before version 19.2.8 and earlier allows a malicious client to communicate with the director without knowledge of the shared secret if the director allows client initiated connection and connects to the client itself. The malicious client can replay the Bareos director's cram-md5 challenge to...
CVE-2020-11081
PUBLISHED: 2020-07-10
osquery before version 4.4.0 enables a priviledge escalation vulnerability. If a Window system is configured with a PATH that contains a user-writable directory then a local user may write a zlib1.dll DLL, which osquery will attempt to load. Since osquery runs with elevated privileges this enables l...
CVE-2020-6114
PUBLISHED: 2020-07-10
An exploitable SQL injection vulnerability exists in the Admin Reports functionality of Glacies IceHRM v26.6.0.OS (Commit bb274de1751ffb9d09482fd2538f9950a94c510a) . A specially crafted HTTP request can cause SQL injection. An attacker can make an authenticated HTTP request to trigger this vulnerabi...