Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Perimeter

3/14/2013
11:36 AM
Adrian Lane
Adrian Lane
Commentary
50%
50%

Database Security Operations

Process -- not tools -- is important

Meeting up with seasoned database security and IT operations teams always keeps me on my toes. The RSA Conference is one such event where I get to meet people who have been doing database security far longer than your average practitioner, and their perspective of the daily grind -- in the trenches -- is very different from my typical analyst inquiry on how to deploy a specific security technology.

To this group of veterans, the tools are secondary; they are only as good as the management process that leverages the tool to automate tasks. Get the process wrong and you end up doing more work, not less, regardless of automation. And if the process is not monitored, tasks -- security or otherwise -- don't get done at all. The lesson that was consistent among this group: Security needs to be part of dev-ops (development and operations teams), built into the process as part of the every day set of tasks to ensure basic quality.

Part of the reason for this is that security, if not implemented, is not something the average IT user notices. Don't do it, and no one complains, and no one notices. Well, until there is a breach. The second, and more selfish reason, is to preserve the sanity of the DBAs. There was only so much they could take on, so adherence to the process showed they were doing their job. It gave them a bar to measure against success or failure, and it limited the number of ad-hoc requests from other organizations. Defining what they would and would not do gives priority to tasks.

One thing clear from my experience is that unless security is systemic to the daily process, it won't work. It's a lesson learned from secure software development. No other security-related discipline is more at odds with productivity -- and the most likely to be set aside in favor of new feature development.

The example I cite most is the need to do security unit testing -- in essence, ensuring the code the developers send to QA does, in fact, meet minimum standards. If you actually require security as part of the hand-off requirement, then the work actually gets done. If you treat security as just another feature, then it must compete with more glamorous additions for attention. And any of you in software development know that, at the end of a waterfall development cycle, decisions are made as to what makes it into the build and what gets cut. Security usually loses to shiny, new toys.

The same holds true for database security. If it's not part of the dev-ops cycles, it gets sidelined in favor of other work. If patching is not a regular, regimented, and monitored process, it tends to sit on the sidelines. If you don't run predeployment validation -- making sure that configurations are accurate -- remove unwanted and unneeded modules, and close secondary avenues of database access like PUBLIC permissions or external procedures, then they hang around forever. Seldom does anyone find the time to go back and clean up a mess, as there is always more to do.

Next week I'll get back to setting up a basic database security program.

Adrian Lane is an analyst/CTO with Securosis LLC, an independent security consulting practice. Special to Dark Reading.

Adrian Lane is a Security Strategist and brings over 25 years of industry experience to the Securosis team, much of it at the executive level. Adrian specializes in database security, data security, and secure software development. With experience at Ingres, Oracle, and ... View Full Bio

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Why Cyber-Risk Is a C-Suite Issue
Marc Wilczek, Digital Strategist & CIO Advisor,  11/12/2019
Unreasonable Security Best Practices vs. Good Risk Management
Jack Freund, Director, Risk Science at RiskLens,  11/13/2019
6 Small-Business Password Managers
Curtis Franklin Jr., Senior Editor at Dark Reading,  11/8/2019
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Write a Caption, Win a Starbucks Card! Click Here
Latest Comment: This comment is waiting for review by our moderators.
Current Issue
Navigating the Deluge of Security Data
In this Tech Digest, Dark Reading shares the experiences of some top security practitioners as they navigate volumes of security data. We examine some examples of how enterprises can cull this data to find the clues they need.
Flash Poll
Rethinking Enterprise Data Defense
Rethinking Enterprise Data Defense
Frustrated with recurring intrusions and breaches, cybersecurity professionals are questioning some of the industrys conventional wisdom. Heres a look at what theyre thinking about.
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2019-11931
PUBLISHED: 2019-11-14
A stack-based buffer overflow could be triggered in WhatsApp by sending a specially crafted MP4 file to a WhatsApp user. The issue was present in parsing the elementary stream metadata of an MP4 file and could result in a DoS or RCE. This affects Android versions prior to 2.19.274, iOS versions prio...
CVE-2019-18980
PUBLISHED: 2019-11-14
On Signify Philips Taolight Smart Wi-Fi Wiz Connected LED Bulb 9290022656 devices, an unprotected API lets remote users control the bulb's operation. Anyone can turn the bulb on or off, or change its color or brightness remotely. There is no authentication or encryption to use the control API. The o...
CVE-2019-17391
PUBLISHED: 2019-11-14
An issue was discovered in the Espressif ESP32 mask ROM code 2016-06-08 0 through 2. Lack of anti-glitch mitigations in the first stage bootloader of the ESP32 chip allows an attacker (with physical access to the device) to read the contents of read-protected eFuses, such as flash encryption and sec...
CVE-2019-18651
PUBLISHED: 2019-11-14
A cross-site request forgery (CSRF) vulnerability in 3xLogic Infinias Access Control through 6.6.9586.0 allows remote attackers to execute malicious and unauthorized actions (e.g., delete application users) by sending a crafted HTML document to a user that the website trusts. The user needs to have ...
CVE-2019-18978
PUBLISHED: 2019-11-14
An issue was discovered in the rack-cors (aka Rack CORS Middleware) gem before 1.0.4 for Ruby. It allows ../ directory traversal to access private resources because resource matching does not ensure that pathnames are in a canonical format.