Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Risk

5/8/2006
07:00 AM
Connect Directly
Twitter
LinkedIn
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

Web App Security

A Web application firewall can be an important component of a multifaceted approach to Web app security.

Web applications are a prime target for criminals and vandals due to the relative ease of attack and the size of the prize. A successful attack on a Web app may result in access to sensitive customer data, enable the attacker to elevate privileges in the database, or even allow the attacker access to the underlying operating system. Victims are subject to public relations problems, possible regulatory sanctions, angry customers, and loss of business. All an attacker needs is time, a Web browser, and a network connection. Poor coding and application design do the rest.

Our inaugural issue of Dark Reading's Security Insider focuses on one of the primary tools that enterprises can use to fend off attacks on Web apps: the Web application firewall. Web app firewalls process HTTP requests and responses, looking for attacks that manipulate submitted form fields, inject malicious text such as SQL or cross-site scripting commands, overflow input strings, manipulate cookies, and exploit other app-level vulnerabilities. Web App Firewalls: Who's Doing What delivers a complete accounting of the products and solutions now available in this critical sector of the security market.

Ideally, a Web app firewall is one component of a multifaceted approach to Web app security. Application security problems should be fixed in the app itself, because that is where the problem lies – not in the network. But apps aren't always fixable: They may be closed-source or compiled-executable, and modifying the app may void support contracts. In such cases, a properly configured Web app firewall offers some measure of protection.

While Web app firewalls clearly have value as a security tool, the reasons for their deployment can be questionable. Organizations might turn to Web app firewalls in response to a break-in, to pass an audit, or, as in the case of an independent software vendor, as a stopgap measure to pass a customer's quality assurance process prior to that customer's accepting the app. None of these reasons are particularly sound, because the Web app firewall potentially covers up underlying issues such as poor coding practices and poor or ineffective security processes.

Whatever your reason for turning to a Web app firewall, there are plenty of options available. Our report provides a complete accounting of the offerings now on the market, including a complete vendor and product matrix that provides point-by-point comparisons for dozens of specific features and functions in an easy-to-navigate spreadsheet. Beyond product comparisons, the report provides insight into how best to deploy these products to protect enterprise resources.

- Mike Fratto, Editor at Large, Dark Reading


The report, Web App Firewalls: Who's Doing What, is available as part of an annual subscription (6 bimonthly issues) to Dark Reading's Security Insider, priced at $1,295. Individual reports are available for $900. For more information, or to subscribe, please visit: www.darkreading.com/insider.

Mike Fratto is a principal analyst at Current Analysis, covering the Enterprise Networking and Data Center Technology markets. Prior to that, Mike was with UBM Tech for 15 years, and served as editor of Network Computing. He was also lead analyst for InformationWeek Analytics ... View Full Bio

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
News
Former CISA Director Chris Krebs Discusses Risk Management & Threat Intel
Kelly Sheridan, Staff Editor, Dark Reading,  2/23/2021
Edge-DRsplash-10-edge-articles
Security + Fraud Protection: Your One-Two Punch Against Cyberattacks
Joshua Goldfarb, Director of Product Management at F5,  2/23/2021
News
Cybercrime Groups More Prolific, Focus on Healthcare in 2020
Robert Lemos, Contributing Writer,  2/22/2021
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Write a Caption, Win an Amazon Gift Card! Click Here
Latest Comment: "The truth behind Stonehenge...."
Current Issue
2021 Top Enterprise IT Trends
We've identified the key trends that are poised to impact the IT landscape in 2021. Find out why they're important and how they will affect you today!
Flash Poll
Building the SOC of the Future
Building the SOC of the Future
Digital transformation, cloud-focused attacks, and a worldwide pandemic. The past year has changed the way business works and the way security teams operate. There is no going back.
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2020-1936
PUBLISHED: 2021-03-02
A cross-site scripting issue was found in Apache Ambari Views. This was addressed in Apache Ambari 2.7.4.
CVE-2021-27904
PUBLISHED: 2021-03-02
An issue was discovered in app/Model/SharingGroupServer.php in MISP 2.4.139. In the implementation of Sharing Groups, the "all org" flag sometimes provided view access to unintended actors.
CVE-2021-27901
PUBLISHED: 2021-03-02
An issue was discovered on LG mobile devices with Android OS 11 software. They mishandle fingerprint recognition because local high beam mode (LHBM) does not function properly during bright illumination. The LG ID is LVE-SMP-210001 (March 2021).
CVE-2021-21321
PUBLISHED: 2021-03-02
fastify-reply-from is an npm package which is a fastify plugin to forward the current http request to another server. In fastify-reply-from before version 4.0.2, by crafting a specific URL, it is possible to escape the prefix of the proxied backend service. If the base url of the proxied server is &...
CVE-2021-21322
PUBLISHED: 2021-03-02
fastify-http-proxy is an npm package which is a fastify plugin for proxying your http requests to another server, with hooks. By crafting a specific URL, it is possible to escape the prefix of the proxied backend service. If the base url of the proxied server is `/pub/`, a user expect that accessing...