Vulnerabilities / Threats

11/5/2018
02:10 PM
Steve Zurier
Steve Zurier
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7 Non-Computer Hacks That Should Never Happen

From paper to IoT, security researchers offer tips for protecting common attack surfaces that you're probably overlooking.
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1. Printers/Multifunction machines
Tyler Robinson, senior managing security analyst and head of offensive services at InGuardians, says infosec pros should make sure their printers are not exposed to the Internet. He adds that infosec pros should change the default passwords and make it clear who on the team has responsibility for printers.
John H. Sawyer, director of red team services at IOActive, adds that infosec pros should recognize that most multifunction devices have hard drives and full-blown operating systems running on them -- which means that hackers may be able to steal printed documents and scanned PDFs from those devices, for example.
Sawyer also says companies that lease multifunction machines and turn them over every couple of years should have a defined destruction policy in place, ensuring the hard drive is destroyed before the device goes back to a vendor.
 Image Source: Pixabay

1. Printers/Multifunction machines

Tyler Robinson, senior managing security analyst and head of offensive services at InGuardians, says infosec pros should make sure their printers are not exposed to the Internet. He adds that infosec pros should change the default passwords and make it clear who on the team has responsibility for printers.

John H. Sawyer, director of red team services at IOActive, adds that infosec pros should recognize that most multifunction devices have hard drives and full-blown operating systems running on them -- which means that hackers may be able to steal printed documents and scanned PDFs from those devices, for example.

Sawyer also says companies that lease multifunction machines and turn them over every couple of years should have a defined destruction policy in place, ensuring the hard drive is destroyed before the device goes back to a vendor.

Image Source: Pixabay

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Big Ralfie
50%
50%
Big Ralfie,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/1/2018 | 2:36:24 PM
Piss-Poor Printouts
Worse yet, when I try to print the article, no matter which page I try to print, all I get is page one. Why are your web designers so lazy?
wperry31
100%
0%
wperry31,
User Rank: Strategist
12/1/2018 | 10:45:11 AM
How about giving us the opportunity to print out the entire article/
When we go through the selection process to view a report - it would be helpful if we could print out the ENTIIRE article rather than one page at a time.  That's a pain.

 

Thanks,

 

 

Bill
jswalsh2000
100%
0%
jswalsh2000,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/12/2018 | 5:24:04 PM
Target breach via HVAC devices?
The information I've read about the Target breach was a Target provided vendor web portal was breached. 

The HVAC service provider's staff had been victims of a phishing attack which allowed for the credentials to be stolen. From there the attackers accessed Target's web portal and hacked into the webserver from there they elevated privileges and started to map Target's north American network which include eftpos endpoints where credit/debit card information was collected. The only reference to HVAC was it happened to be an HVAC company engaged to service HVAC systems for stores in a region.

If the assessment of this breach has changed or been updated, can you please provide urls which descibe Target's HVAC device compromise so I can update my understanding of the breach.

Thanks
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