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Vulnerabilities / Threats

9/23/2013
12:18 AM
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Apple iPhone 5s Fooled By Fake Finger

Chaos Computer Club hackers bypass the fingerprint sensor in Apple's iPhone 5s, may qualify for Touch ID hack bounty.

Apple iOS 7: Visual Tour
Apple iOS 7: Visual Tour
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Hackers from the Chaos Computer Club have shown that the fingerprint scanner in Apple's iPhone 5s can be fooled by an artificial fingerprint made using readily available materials.

The group has posted a video on YouTube that demonstrates the effectiveness of their technique.

In a statement on the group's website, CCC spokesman Frank Rieger warns that fingerprint biometric technology is insecure and unwise as a means of authentication. "It is plain stupid to use something that you can't change and that you leave everywhere every day as a security token," he said. "The public should no longer be fooled by the biometrics industry with false security claims. Biometrics is fundamentally a technology designed for oppression and control, not for securing everyday device access."

[ If Tim Cook says it, does that make it true? Read Apple CEO Cook: We Don't Do Junk. ]

Apple did not respond to a request for comment. Last week, in an apparent attempt to address privacy and security concerns, an Apple spokesman told the Wall Street Journal that the Touch ID system does not store fingerprint images.

Fingerprint scanning systems have a long history of vulnerability to hacking. Working with a German TV show in 2007, the CCC demonstrated that fingerprint authentication technology used by a German supermarket could be duped. The group says that what differentiates Apple's technology from other fingerprint scanners is a higher resolution sensor.

Bypassing Touch ID involves photographing a fingerprint at 2400 dpi resolution, cleaning the image up and then laser printing it at 1200 dpi on a transparent sheet using a heavy toner setting. To the resulting relief pattern, either wood glue or pink latex milk is applied, which hardens to form the surface of the fake fingerprint. The hardened substance is then lifted from the transparent sheet, breathed on for moisture and applied to the iPhone Touch ID scanner to unlock the device.

The CCC posted instructions about how to create a fake fingerprint back in 2004. In the past decade, the risks of fingerprint spoofing have been widely covered in academic research. In 2006, researchers from Washington & Jefferson College reported, "biometric fingerprint scanners can easily be spoofed with Play-doh, gummy bears and other household materials." In 2002, Yokohama National University researchers reported, "artificial fingers that are easily made of cheap and readily available gelatin were accepted by extremely high rates by particular fingerprint devices with optical or capacitive sensors."

Evidently, this is still the case with Apple's technology, though the security community has yet to evaluate the hack. Last week, security researchers Robert Graham and Nick DePedrillo established a crowdsourced bounty program, through the website IsTouchIDHackedYet.com, to reward the first person or group to break Apple's Touch ID system. As of Sunday evening, the website indicated that the CCC's hack may qualify for the bounty, the amount of which remains in question due to conditions placed on a pledge of $10,000 committed by venture capitalist Arturas Rosenbacher.

Learn more about smartphone security and related topics by attending the Interop conference track on Mobility in New York from Sept. 30 to Oct. 4.

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framework4
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framework4,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/24/2013 | 10:34:10 AM
re: Apple iPhone 5s Fooled By Fake Finger
Clearly these folks do not understand. The goal is to have usable security that will stop someone accessing the phone if it is lost or stolen by a random thief. I currently use a 4 digit code, my anniversary, easily defeated. For me fingerprints will be a huge step up. It is like those folks who expose "The Club" by showing how easy it is to defeat by cutting the steering wheel. So what? I still use "The Club" on my car because the average thief is not wandering around with a hacksaw. Likewise the average thief is NOT going to have a copy of my fingerprint.
Thomas Claburn
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Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Ninja
9/24/2013 | 4:03:01 AM
re: Apple iPhone 5s Fooled By Fake Finger
Forcing someone's hand, so to speak, is a legitimate concern for those who believe they should not have to divulge passwords on demand to authorities.
feskridge
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50%
feskridge,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/23/2013 | 9:47:17 PM
re: Apple iPhone 5s Fooled By Fake Finger
According to the movies, another way to spoof fingerprint security is to find an authorized person, kill them, cut off their finger, and then use that. This technique also works with eye scanners. You just need to remove the head and hold it up to the scanner. This stuff is really so simple!
dtkerns
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50%
dtkerns,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/23/2013 | 4:49:37 PM
re: Apple iPhone 5s Fooled By Fake Finger
They are absolutely right, what we need is an RFID chip implanted in our right-hand or forehead.
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